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Alternatively, other contributors allude to "'post-cannibalism'," picas to "avoid the notion that the text 'cannibalizes' the text of others [sicj texts" (37), or a refusal to engage in "auto-(and also author-) anthropophagi a" (187).
Othello's biography includes a collection of vivid stories that are both frightening ("Of hair-breadth scapes i' th' imminent deadly breach" [137]) and exotic ("And of the cannibals that each other eat,/The Anthropophagi, and men whose heads/Do grow beneath their shoulders" [144-146]), and they understandably captivate Desdemona:
But other Spanish historical sources have it that the Tlaxcalans participated in the campaign against Tenochtitlan as allies of the Spaniards while still worshipping their pre-Hispanic deities and practicing anthropophagi (41) and that they did not fully convert to Christianity until the late 1520s.
I ran it through, even from my boyish days, To th' very moment that he bade me tell it, Wherein I spake of most disastrous chances, Of moving accidents by flood and field, Of hair-breadth scapes I'th' imminent deadly breach, Of being taken by the insolent foe And sold to slavery; of my redemption thence And portance in my travailous history; Wherein of antres vast and deserts idle, Rough quarries, rocks and hills whose heads touch heaven It was my hint to speak--such was the process-And of the cannibals that each other eat, The Anthropophagi, and men whose heads Do grow beneath their shoulders.
We wanted ethnographic titillation, and Othello's stories "of the Cannibals that each other eat, the Anthropophagi, and men whose heads grew beneath their shoulders" were a perfect complement to my Venetian life.
I ran it through, even from my boyish days To th'very moment that he bade me tell it; Wherein I spake of most disastrous chances, Of moving accidents by flood and field; Of hair-breadth scapes i'th'imminent deadly breach; Of being taken by the insolent foe And sold to slavery; of my redemption thence, And portance in my travailous history; Wherein of antres vast and deserts idle, Rough quarries, rocks, and hills whose heads touch heaven, It was my hint to speak--such was my process-- And of the cannibals that each other eat, The Anthropophagi, and men whose heads Do grow beneath their shoulders.
Thus, we gather that Columbus' source was not the Arawaks but certain classical, or Mediterranean, stories, in which barbarian lands are peopled by monsters such as the Cyclops, anthropophagi, and dog-headed men' (p.
If there is one fault to this volume it is its relative neglect of broader ethnographic debates on the subject of anthropophagi.
142-44) with London lotus-eaters, a sly hit at the vegetarians' fanatical condemnation of meat eaters as anthropophagi.
Although he admits that Britain needs manpower for the army, navy, merchant marine, and colonial service, this true-born Englishman would go to any lengths to keep the Scots out: I will give my vote for naturalizing the Jews, the Turks, and the Gentiles; for inviting over the Corsairs of Barbary, the Hottentots of Afric, or the Anthropophagi that one another do eat (Tobias Smollett, Poems, Plays, and The Briton, ed.
The references to the cannibals and the anthropophagi thus figure as examples of Brabantio's summonsing of Othello by repeated questioning, as of one who would demand, `And what about those men, Othello, whose heads grow beneath their shoulders?
To indicate how he captivated Desdemona, Othello mentions two exotic races he has told her about: "The Anthropophagi, and men whose heads / Do grow beneath their shoulders" (1.
The name Caliban, he argues, is a deformation of an Arawak or Cariban word that the Spaniards translated as canibal, meaning anthropophagi for the Europeans.
Shakespeare does this in many places, but two will suffice here to make this point: a speech Othello makes about the Anthropophagi and one Caliban makes about the island.