animosity

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  • noun

Synonyms for animosity

Synonyms for animosity

deep-seated hatred, as between longtime opponents or rivals

Synonyms for animosity

a feeling of ill will arousing active hostility

References in periodicals archive ?
It was the resurrection of ancient animosities, he said.
Vasari was obviously wrong about many things, and may have distorted others; his unusually harsh criticism of Pontormo is certainly curious, but a question remains as to what extent Vasari is expressing deeply-felt convictions or true animosities, and to what extent he deliberately and cynically slandered his rivals in order to solidify his professional position.
Whether Stanley Crouch was right to insist that "Race is over" depends not just on the economy but on leadership that responds to voters who look past both racial animosities and pieties.
The stadium forms a vast outdoor room both spacious and welcoming, that confounds the traditional typology of football grounds as hermetic cauldrons fermenting tribal animosities.
We may have had troubles, anxieties, and even personal animosities as we came to practice for the Sunday liturgy, but as soon as we joined our voices in singing the chant melodies, we seemed to be raised above that everyday world.
Justice Kennedy wrote that "reciprocal sale privileges risks generating the trade rivalries and animosities, the alliances and exclusivity, that the Constitution and, in particular, the Commerce Clause were designed to avoid.
Noting that the Iranian people have no doubt about the United States' animosity towards their country, Jalali stressed that Iranians stand against the United States' animosities and will not allow Washington to interfere in their country's internal affairs.
We need to learn to work together and put our personal animosities aside.
Animosities in Marlowe's play anticipate criticism of the Jacobean Bedchamber in part because Marlowe was responding to libels provoked by innovations in the chamber politics of the French king Henri III that also anticipate Jacobean practice.
With cold war animosities gone, agreement could be reached more often than not.
The characters overcome animosities and bond unexpectedly, primarily through shared miseries.
With animosities intensifying between England and Germany, the British government gave Sir Frank its backing and essentially took over his project.