anger


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Related to anger: Anger problems
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  • noun
  • verb

Synonyms for anger

Synonyms for anger

a strong feeling of displeasure or hostility

to cause to feel or show anger

Synonyms for anger

References in classic literature ?
But of this we will take thought hereafter; for the present, let us draw a ship into the sea, and find a crew for her expressly; let us put a hecatomb on board, and let us send Chryseis also; further, let some chief man among us be in command, either Ajax, or Idomeneus, or yourself, son of Peleus, mighty warrior that you are, that we may offer sacrifice and appease the the anger of the god.
The son of Peleus was furious, and his heart within his shaggy breast was divided whether to draw his sword, push the others aside, and kill the son of Atreus, or to restrain himself and check his anger.
And therefore, when men are ingenious in picking out circumstances of contempt, they do kindle their anger much.
When your anger shall have passed, you will regret what you have done; and then I wish to be in a position to show you your signature.
and he turned inquiringly to Balashev, and evidently this thought turned him back on to the track of his morning's anger, which was still fresh in him.
On the contrary, he was extremely angry, with the confused impotent anger of one who finds himself unreasonably but efficiently frustrated.
Both were shocked at their mutual situation--that each should have betrayed anger towards the other.
Olvia Marthis was her friend--she was very fond of her and she felt no anger toward her.
The evening of the day on which I had taken my madman's resolution to depart in anger from all that was dear to me found me in that congenial spot.
She was a shameless hussy," said Felicity, venting on the long- dead Ursula that anger she dare not visit on the Story Girl.
And so Hesiod says that oaths touching the matter of love do not draw down anger from the gods: `And thereafter he ordained that an oath concerning the secret deeds of the Cyprian should be without penalty for men.
The moral of the tale is, that anger at times goes to war with desire, as though they were two distinct things.
His anger is too much kindled for you to commune with him at present.
The feeling of furious anger with his wife, who would not observe the proprieties and keep to the one stipulation he had laid on her, not to receive her lover in her own home, gave him no peace.
The implied reproaches against her father--her father, who was lying there in a sort of living death--neutralized all her pity for griefs about tablecloths and china; and her anger on her father's account was heightened by some egoistic resentment at Tom's silent concurrence with her mother in shutting her out from the common calamity.