anemia


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Related to anemia: iron deficiency anemia
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Synonyms for anemia

References in periodicals archive ?
The prevalence of anemia varies little by other background characteristics.
The racial difference in vitamin D levels and anemia suggests that current therapeutic targets for preventing or treating these conditions may warrant a further look, the researchers said.
If blood tests show someone has anemia, working with one's doctors to figure out the cause is important," Sico said.
Causes of anemia in HF patients include nutritional deficiencies (malabsorption, impaired metabolism), acute blood loss (gastrointestinal bleeding), decrease in erythropoietin production and response to erythropoietin due to the intrinsic renal disease, hemodilution because of volume expansion, relative iron deficiency, chronic disease anemia, etc.
Incidence of anemia in older people: an epidemiologic study in a well-defined population.
When the vitamin is deficient, sickle cell anemia may also show a response to vitamin supplements.
Anemia information at baseline was available for about 94% of patients, including 10,839 without anemia and 2,200 with anemia.
As noted, since hemoglobin lives in red blood cells, another major cause of anemia is a lack of red blood cells.
Sales of the company's early anemia drug, Epogen, slid 5 percent.
Currently, the company is carrying out phase I trials for renal anemia associated with chronic renal failure in Japan.
Darbepoetin alfa: impact on treatment for chemotherapy-induced anemia and considerations in special populations.
Anemia appears to significantly increase the likelihood that older people will experience a physical decline that erodes their ability to live independently.
GI blood loss or iron deficiency anemia in runners is multifactorial.
The National Anemia Action Council has launched a Web site, www.
People suffering from chronic kidney disease, heart disease and diabetes often are unknowingly hit by a second, hidden disease: anemia.