anapest


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  • noun

Synonyms for anapest

a metrical unit with unstressed-unstressed-stressed syllables

References in periodicals archive ?
This duration is divided between the syllables within the foot: the three syllables of the anapest will have to share the time allotted for the two syllables of the iamb.
This covers the traditional notions anapest, dactyl, iamb, and spondee.
Then, as the lovers meet, and the plot begins to advance, ensuing sections again take up the basic exposition, albeit even here with the iamb in appropriate cases replaced by the anapest, and the octasyllablic line by the more stately pentameter couplet.
Swinburne wrote of Browning, "Actually the writer has made three long heavy full syllables--equivalent properly to a spondee and a half serve as equivalent to a single anapest.
The second anapest is a bit of a long shot: "-ing, frayed by" is carried more by the rising metrical tendency than much else.
Caesura, breath, drama, intent; can trochee, anapest, tongue,
As with the skill of verses properly managed the little river quietly makes its way along the valley and through the local village below the smiling hospitable house, easily flowing over the shining stones, trochee, and an anapest, pyrrhic, and also spondee, under the heartbeat easy governance of long continued metrical discipline.
In a metrical analysis of George Meredith's poem "Lucifer in Starlight," Warren suggests that in the first line the meter is "as a trochee followed by a foot with a hovering accent or a spondee, and not as an anapest followed by a monosyllabic foot.
The notion that such traditional poets would tolerate an anapest followed by a monosyllabic foot seems remarkably anachronistic.
I wrote, for example, a poem which I thought of as a sort of mirror-image poem, that went something like dactyl, trochee, iamb, anapest.
The emphasis of the rhyme, coming as it does after the rushing anapest, is to settle the word "knew" much deeper in the voice than the word "yew.
Those last two syllables, bias and habit whispered in my ear, are prosodical ante, a line of metrical credit on which line 2 teaches its even-numbered successors to draw as the borrowed first half of their initial anapest.
331-347) are like Leighton eloquent guides to how we might freshly listen to Tennyson, whether to cadences embedded in phrases that cross lines and in which further verbal play unfolds (McDonald), or to the feminine ending of each stanza's third line in "The Daisy," which "giv[es] the upcoming anapest something to answer to" (Pritchard, p.
In terms of English accentual-syllabic prosody, every fourth line of "Milton" can be heard as two dactyls and two trochees ("Milton, a name to resound for ages") or alternately, trochee, iamb, anapest, and iamb with a final unstressed syllable ("Rings to the roar of an angel onset").
In the trimeter lines closing the third and fourth stanzas, the opening anapest invites spondaic emphasis.