amphora

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  • noun

Words related to amphora

an ancient jar with two handles and a narrow neck

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References in periodicals archive ?
A Texan, Billy Ray Mangham of Sleeping Dog Pottery and his team, have a 'Qevri Project: Andrew Beckham, a potter and winemaker in Oregon has his own Amphorae Project: Also, a potter on the outskirts of Austria is now making qveris.
Mendes, a set of 152 ceramic fragments, include amphorae, gray pottery and common ware.
saying that she wanted to return the amphorae that her husband had brought from Turkey.
The wine press provides the earliest molecular evidence for wine-making in France and the traces in the amphorae support the idea that local wine-making was inspired by trade with Etruscans from Italy, researchers report June 3 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Then they all started shouting that amphorae were planted.
It contained hundreds of amphorae, or clay jars, used for shipping oil, olives, wine and other food products.
What remained poking out of seafloor mud was all of the inorganic material--hundreds of empty ceramic amphorae.
This was kept in semi-porous pottery amphorae, which were stored in large underground cellars insulated with mud brick to maintain a cool environment (Curtis, 2001).
We pass stacked red amphorae always full into a windowless room.
While the manufacture and prime uses of ceramics occupy 27 pages, 131 describe reuse of amphorae (just 15 cover the reuse of other categories).
The operation, codenamed Amphorae, ran between October and November across Birmingham where police traditionally see high levels of calls to alcohol-related disorder.
With glass, we took a leap from amphorae and goat bladders.
A Petrographic and Chemical Study of East Greek and Other Archaic Transport Amphorae," [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] 4, pp.
An archaeologist from the University of Southampton has identified the first fragments of Roman wine amphorae ever found in Kerala in southwestern India.
Spanish scientists who have developed a technique to determine the colour of wine have used it to study wine residue samples taken from amphorae found inside the tomb of King Tutankhamun.