ambulance


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  • noun

Words related to ambulance

a vehicle that takes people to and from hospitals

References in classic literature ?
Mulcahy shivered when the former spoke of the knife as an intimate acquaintance, or the latter dwelt with loving particularity on the fate of those who, wounded and helpless, had been overlooked by the ambulances, and had fallen into the hands of the Afghan women-folk.
Her ears caught a rumble, fainter than thunder, and the splash of horses' hoofs--"it's too muddy for the motor ambulance," she thought, mechanically.
I was sitting on deck with some of the fellows who were going into the American ambulance service with me, my Airedale, Crown Prince Nobbler, asleep at my feet, when the first blast of the whistle shattered the peace and security of the ship.
Every once in a while some robber turns soft-hearted and takes to driving an ambulance.
I strongly advise, Doctor Masters, a thorough fumigation of the ambulance afterward.
Doctor Masters, don't forget that ambulance when you're quit of the load.
He was not her child, she said, and recommended that the ambulance be called to take him to the city receiving hospital.
The sharp clang of a passing ambulance at the corner gave him a start.
They were now comfortably laid at rest in the kitchen, under the care of the French surgeon and the English nurse attached to the ambulance.
Vinegar, and the slapping of wrists and burnt feathers proving of no avail, some one ran to 'phone for an ambulance.
But now, just because it was terrible, because people broke their necks, and there was a doctor standing at each obstacle, and an ambulance with a cross on it, and a sister of mercy, he had made up his mind to take part in the race.
with my own hand, which, as you will gather, was not very badly wounded; it was simply this third finger that was split and in splints; and next morning the doctor packed me off on a bovine beast that would have done for an ambulance.
One may picture the orderly expectation, the officers alert and watchful, the gunners ready, the ammunition piled to hand, the limber gunners with their horses and waggons, the groups of civilian spectators standing as near as they were permitted, the evening stillness, the ambulances and hospital tents with the burned and wounded from Weybridge; then the dull resonance of the shots the Martians fired, and the clumsy projectile whirling over the trees and houses and smashing amid the neighbouring fields.
Beyond these newspaper buildings again, and partially hidden by the arches of the old Elevated Railway of New York (long since converted into a mono-rail), there was another cordon of police and a sort of encampment of ambulances and doctors, busy with the dead and wounded who had been killed early in the night by the panic upon Brooklyn Bridge.
Came the long line of stalled street-cars, the crowd, the police holding it back, the two ambulances drawn up and waiting their freight, and the young policeman, whose beat it was, white and shaken, greeting him with: "It's horrible, man.