allusiveness


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  • noun

Words related to allusiveness

a quality characterized by indirect reference

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References in periodicals archive ?
Paradoxically, then, the simile, which calls attention to itself in various ways (its epic-ness, allusiveness, etc.
Elytis used both these modes, but he worked as well in Pound-like lyrically fragmented free verse, Eliot-like cultural allusiveness and muffled autobiography, Thomas-like richness, and Stevens-like abstraction.
Allusiveness (where did that awkward pose come from?
We know, or have tried to analyze, many of the mechanisms causing us to choose certain images as figurae, as emblems that have, alternately, a well-identified, circumscribed semantic value or a nuanced allusiveness, a varying evocative resonance.
Drawing on a classical tradition of poetic lament, Yang's poem is complex in its literary, historical, and mythic allusiveness.
The paintings themselves are rife with allusions to the Northern Romantic tradition, and yet they don't seem to be overly preoccupied with their allusiveness.
In part 4, "(the engineer of the soul)," the texts are personal again - with typical Esterhazy allusiveness.
Furthermore, he passes from an erotic allusiveness to the artificial romantic air of a sentimental novel by Liala, with its references to aviators (but a private in the air force is never trained as a pilot
Skillfully translated as here, it introduces a new, unfamiliar language, though, as any translation must, slightly altering the tone and allusiveness of the original.
Focusing on Doctor Copernicus, Kepler, and The Newton Letter, he shows that the allusiveness and self-reflexivity of Banville's fiction is a textual narcissism which is akin to the self-absorption of the characters examined in previous chapters.
Also, at times unavoidably, Chinese allusiveness takes over--the names of fourteen Chinese authors, none of them well known to the English reader, appear on the first essay's opening page.
dense allusiveness, and supposed lack of lyricism, he was often
A notable example of this allusiveness occurs in Lewis' That Hideous Strength, where young Mark Studdock's first feelings of real love for his wife are illuminated by a memory of Socrates' teaching on this score.
But bearing in mind Hemingway's reflexive allusiveness, consider for a moment the famously hubristic words of Kaiser Wilhelm II, uttered in August 1914 as he watched his German troops heading off to the Great War: "You will be home before the leaves have fallen from the trees" (qtd.
The work's two most evident but seemingly incompatible aspects, reductive objecthood and post-performative allusiveness, somehow come to seem mutually implicated.