alienist

(redirected from alienists)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical.
  • noun

Words related to alienist

a psychiatrist and specialist in the legal aspects of mental illness

References in periodicals archive ?
It depends, just as with a finger-print expert or an alienist, upon whether or not we have specialized in that particular field.
Take the instance of an alienist, your honor, when he is put on the stand.
Wigmore envisioned a subscriber base of "10,000 persons, including prosecuting attorneys, judges, police officials, prison officials, medical men, alienists, psychologists, sociologists, and philanthropists.
64) Wigmore believed that Ferri would attract a wide audience of "prison reformers, psychologists, alienists and sociologists, as well as lawyers" (65)--the same cross-section of professionals that would make up the Institute.
Part and parcel to this were also the connections frequently drawn by alienists and literary critics between imaginative power and mental imbalances.
In 1840s America, Southern alienists had already added to the sub-categories of insanity by identifying something they called drapetomania: a slave's "uncontrollable urge to run away from slavery.
The medical profession complained incessantly about the rules, and in lectures, articles and books alienists argued that they alone possessed the necessary qualifications to judge criminal responsibility.
These alienists devoted a great deal of attention to the pathologies of womanhood and the menstrual cycle.
Unlike most alienists, whose education was haphazard, Cotton entered his field with sterling scientific credentials.
84 (1931), upholding the constitutionality of a section of the California Penal Code authorizing the court to appoint alienists to examine an accused person.
The prosecution will have no alienists called to examine them unless the defense makes the first move in that direction.
In his report on "L'Assistance des alienes aux colonies" at the 1912 Congress of French and Francophone Alienists and Neurologists in Tunis, French psychiatrist Emmanuel Regis condemned the political obstacles to meaningful assistance for the Algerian insane, and argued that continued transportation of lunatics itself constituted a pathogen.
The term psychiatrist only began to be used after 1860, and for most of the nineteenth century French psychiatrists referred to themselves as alienists.
She discusses the somatic school of medicine that tried to find a physical basis for nervous and mental diseases, the moral-pastoral role of alienists (the first psychiatrists), and the numerous specialties that tried to market their skills to nervous patients.
And, more than any other group, alienists (nineteenth-century forerunners of psychiatry) provided the perfect combination of scientific and moral rhetoric to legitimize the popular and religious beliefs that had connected modernity with increased suicides.