alienable


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Related to alienable: descendible
  • adj

Antonyms for alienable

transferable to another owner

References in periodicals archive ?
I am therefore not arguing that Aboriginal title lands should be freely alienable.
Imagine the commercial world wide web in a world that treats personal data as alienable personal property.
It is confusing indeed that V&Z compare the alienable and inalienable uses of nouns to verbs that may be used transitively (as causatives), or intransitively, but then represent the allegedly "transitive" inalienable variants of nominal predicates with a single argument slot throughout their paper (consequently the predicates corresponding to alienable uses of nouns have no argument slot at all in V&Z's paper).
Indeed, I argue that a solution based on alienable rights flows naturally from familiar liberal principles.
In Oceanic linguistics, two different types of possession are generally recognized: alienable and inalienable possession (Lynch 1973, 1996, 1998; Lichtenberk 1983).
Alienable rights to fairness imply that neither F* nor F** would give any weight to unfairness, regardless "how much" unfairness is at stake, if everyone prefers to override fairness concerns.
EX = first person exclusive non-singular pronoun, 2SG = second person singular pronoun, 2NSG = second person non-singular pronoun, 3SG = third person singular pronoun, 3NSG = third person non-singular pronoun, ACC = accusative case article, AL = alienable noun suffix, APPL applicative suffix, CAUS = causative prefix, COM = comitative preposition, CONJ = conjunction, CONST = construct suffix, DEN = 'denizen of', DIR = suffix indicting motion towards addressee, or past/future deictic centre, DL = dual number particle, IRR = irrealis mood particle, LOC = locative case article, O = object enclitic, P = possessive suffix, PERS = personal noun article, REAL = realis mood particle, REDUP = reduplication, S = subject proclitic, TEL = telic aspect particle, to.
1s 1st person singular 1px 1st person plural exclusive 2s 2nd person singular 3d 3rd person dual 3f 3rd person singular feminine 3m 3rd person singular masculine 3s 3rd person singular 3p 3rd person plural f feminine m masculine sg singular pl plural O object S subject ASP aspect ANAPH anaphoric demonstrative COYT continuous aspect DEM demonstrative EMPH emphatic clitic HAB habitual aspect YEG negation PossI inalienable possessive PossII alienable possessive RED reduplication RELR relator [stm.
extent future interests created in grantors are alienable, as they often
its not being available for treatment as an alienable commodity, the communal basis of its tenure), and
11) Run-of-the-mill DOCs generally imply an alienable possession relation between the referent of the primary object and the referent of the secondary object (70), but also inalienable possession (71) and experiencer readings (72) embedded under a causative component are replicated by the DOC.
The land then became the property of tribal members in fee simple, fully alienable and taxable.
Thus, contrary to the example offered by one reviewer, inalienability, in Weiner's terms, does not refer to the Western concept of immovable property as opposed to movable, alienable property.
This observation is only partially in line with Heine's (1997a: 92-93) statement that the COMPANION schema is "more likely to express physical and temporary or, more generally, alienable possession rather than inalienable possession".
That kind of divide and rule attitude is very dangerous because it undermine the communal co-existence who supposed to enjoy freedom to life and their alienable rights.