alarum


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  • noun

Synonyms for alarum

a signal that warns of imminent danger

Synonyms for alarum

References in periodicals archive ?
Thomas Lodge's An Alarum against Usurers (1584) makes only one metaphorical reference to Jews, but its most intense outrage against usury arises from anxiety about social mobility.
Although women do get their own back: Tibi fertur valle sub alarum trux habitare caper.
In response, she wrote two treatises in 1649: An Alarum of War and Another Alarum of War.
Distribution: K/O/Mo/L/Ma/H (ex) (E) Elaphoglossum alarum Gaudich.
Alarum for London, or The Siedge of Antwerpe, 1602, 11.
I applaud her brave alarum against out economic and social complacency.
There was no fear or alarum, then, when from her seated position she heard the grasses of the meadow swaying as something or someone approached.
The fact that Shakespeare has them gather there to witness, benefit from and/or add to the criminal events in Denmark at the highest level of the state, however, arguably amounts to Shakespeare's sounding an alarum about a sovereign violence rife throughout Europe.
This disturbance awakens Othello, thanks in part to the alarum bell.
And while down below everything disintegrated and changed into nothingness in that silent panic of quick dissolution, above there grew and endured the alarum of sunset.
dreadful marches and stern alarums, the hope remains that the efforts of
Hence, just as Saddam's statues were being dragged through the streets of Baghdad and that news was being reported, critiqued, and discussed in more ways than have ever been possible in all of human history, alarums were being sounded that what we really need in the U.
PRAYER FOR THE LIVING Yes to poems after Auschwitz that disturb the day with alarums of warning, primal qualms that make city dwellers look up from the curb skyward; yes to interplay of sound that calms the night, induces sleep, allows the apple to remain on the tree and not fall to the field before its time, men and women to grapple with good and evil twinned terminally.
Richard of Gloucester's 'stem alarums chang'd to merry meetings' and 'dreadful marches' exchanged with 'merry meetings' are translated as 'sociopolitical changes that have recently transpired in England'.
Langford focuses our usually space-case neighbors from the north into tight, hook-happy arrangements on tales of the redemptive and sometimes rabid power of music, wasted elegies to, well, wastedness and radical political alarums that sound more like the second coming of the late Joe Strummer than sentiments from our own musical heartland - which, of course, is why we need foreigners to stir things up now and then.