aflatoxin

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  • noun

Words related to aflatoxin

a potent carcinogen from the fungus Aspergillus

References in periodicals archive ?
Concern on aflatoxin mainly focuses on exposure to very high levels of aflatoxin as occurs during aflatoxicosis outbreaks, and reflected by most studies on aflatoxin contamination having been carried out in Eastern Province, an area that is assumed to have highest levels of exposure.
Effect of sodium bentonite, mannan oligosaccharide and humate on performance and serum biochemical parameters during aflatoxicosis in broiler chickens.
Evidence of acute aflatoxicosis in humans has been reported from many parts of the world, namely the Third World Countries, like Taiwan, Uganda, India, and many others.
Pathology of lymphoid organs in aflatoxicosis and ochratoxicosis and immuno-modulatory effect of vitamin E and selenium in broiler chicken.
11) Clinical signs of aflatoxicosis vary, depending on the degree and length of exposure; these include listlessness, ataxia, decreased activity, decreased feed consumption, and weight loss.
These results suggest a protective effect of [alpha]-LA on aflatoxicosis.
During an outbreak of aflatoxicosis that killed over 125 people in Kenya in 2004, victims experienced abdominal pain, pulmonary edema, liver necrosis, and finally death after ingesting doses of aflatoxin [B.
Extensive research was conducted to counteract aflatoxicosis by physical, chemical, nutritional and biological approaches.
6) Clinical signs of aflatoxicosis are depression, poor growth, and weight loss, and necropsy findings include an enlarged pale liver commonly infiltrated with fat, splenomegaly, and pancreatic enlargement?
Some enterosorbents may be appropriate for treatment for acute outbreaks of aflatoxicosis, but not for chronic treatment due to cost and possible side effects.
Efficacy of montmorillonite clay (NovaSil PLUS) for protecting full-term broilers from aflatoxicosis.
8) pg/mg], possibly because acute exposures during an aflatoxicosis outbreak in 2004 may have masked any potential underlying relationship.
No animal species is immune to the acute toxic effects of aflatoxins including humans; however, humans have an extraordinarily high tolerance for aflatoxin exposure and rarely succumb to acute aflatoxicosis.
Williams JH, Phillips TD, Jolly PE, Stiles JK, Jolly CM and D Aggarwal Human aflatoxicosis in developing countries: A review of toxicology, exposure, potential health consequences and interventions.