adoptee


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  • noun

Words related to adoptee

someone (such as a child) who has been adopted

References in periodicals archive ?
Thousands of Irish adoptees don't know their original names, who their parents are or even if there is a serious illness that runs in the family.
In the above excerpt, Caesar pointed to the difference his status as an adoptee makes in terms of how he is perceived, as did Sofia:
Most adoptees are hungry for information that will lead to their birth parents, but some are also expanding their conception of family as they embrace a far-flung constellation of second, third and fourth cousins.
But in order for a reunion with the mother (and/or father or siblings) to be successful, the adoptee must ensure that he or she is emotionally prepared.
The Illinois Legislature passed the most fundamental change in the state's adoption-privacy statutes in the past half-century, potentially opening the books for adoptees seeking their own birth records--and their biological parents' identities.
He says a course on "The Adoptee Experience" would help them--and others--better understand China's one-child policy and how and why it has caused many people there to give up infant girls.
That case prompted the discovery of 20 more cases of hepatitis A among nontraveling contacts of international adoptees during 2006-2007.
Teresa Brown is a retired paralegal, a reunited birthmother, the daughter of adoptive parents, and the sister to an adoptee.
This gathering of an emerging Korean adoptee movement consisted of 400 participants, mostly from the U.
Instead the government will amend the Act to permit a veto by adoptee or parent against opening past records but will open future adoption records completely.
I choose to believe that my birth parents were being heroic, not cruel, when they set me on my journey as an adoptee.
The Adoption Mystique is uncompromising in its view that adoption should be a process that considers the rights of the adoptee over the wishes of the birth parents or adoptive parents in instances where no compromise is possible, examines bias against adoptees in the media and society, and debunks the myth that an adopted person is sundered of ties to their heritage, or that they should just "get over" the need to search for their birth record information.
Loss often leads to grief, particularly if the adoptee has very little contact with the birth parents (Common Clinical Issues Among Adoptees, 1995; Hochman & Huston, 1995; Leon, 2002; Silverstein & Kaplan, 1982).
To continue Prime coverage past the first 60 days, you must enroll your newborn or adoptee in either TRICARE Prime or TRICARE Prime Remote for Active-Duty Family Members within 60 days.
Meanwhile, at the same time, an adult adoptee or fostered individual who was raised in a "permanent home" is struggling to make his way back to his beginning, finding his people and searching for that sense of belonging.