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Related to adjective: predicate adjective
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  • noun
  • adj

Synonyms for adjective

the word class that qualifies nouns

of or relating to or functioning as an adjective


relating to court practice and procedure as opposed to the principles of law

References in classic literature ?
It must be especially observed in justice to poor Kit that he was by no means of a sentimental turn, and perhaps had never heard that adjective in all his life.
Thus the terms 'whiteness','grammar', 'justice', give us the adjectives 'white','grammatical', 'just', and so on.
As to the adjectives, I said, if I remember right, amiable, unambitious, and absent-minded.
old beau loves with an hysterical fervor that requires four adjectives to every noun to properly describe.
His adjectives were too foul for print; they were given with such a special effort at distinctness, however, that I was smiling one instant, and giving thanks the next that Eva Denison had not come forward with her guardian.
He used gestures instead of adjectives, and he halted.
Black headlines, notes of exclamation, the use of superlative adjectives, scarcely met the case.
They had no fixed values, to be altered by adjectives and adverbs.
Even the most minor adjectives applicable to her are bound to be sheer superlatives.
Out of this, the facetious habit had arisen in the neighbourhood surrounding Mincing Lane of making christian names for him of adjectives and participles beginning with R.
This last was a piece of biting sarcasm against the INDEPENDENT, who, in consequence of not having been invited at all, had been, through four numbers, affecting to sneer at the whole affair, in his very largest type, with all the adjectives in capital letters.
compounding in Orhon inscriptions are formed of adjective + descriptive adjectives and descriptive adjective + relatative adjective.
It should be noted that what is a determining adjective in one expression, can be a confirming adjective in another.
Where one and the same form appears to perform syntactic functions ascribed to the category adjective and also to the category adverb, as in (8) and (9) below, it does so as the result of a set of specific processes that entail lexical change and where a contrast between literal and figurative meaning exists, i.
By far the most obvious is the overuse of the word 'cool' which surely has to be totally superfluous at a winter sports event, but the far more irritating adjective in uncommonly common usage is 'crazy'.