address

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Synonyms for address

give a speech to

Synonyms

  • give a speech to
  • talk to
  • speak to
  • lecture
  • discourse
  • harangue
  • give a talk to
  • spout to
  • hold forth to
  • expound to
  • orate to
  • sermonize to

speak to

Synonyms

take aim at

Synonyms

address yourself to something

Synonyms

Synonyms for address

to direct speech to

Synonyms

to talk to an audience formally

to bring an appeal or request, for example, to the attention of

to mark (a written communication) with its destination

to devote (oneself or one's efforts)

to cause (something) to be conveyed to a destination

a usually formal oral communication to an audience

romantic attentions

behavior through which one reveals one's personality

the ability to say and do the right thing at the right time

Synonyms for address

(computer science) the code that identifies where a piece of information is stored

the place where a person or organization can be found or communicated with

the manner of speaking to another individual

a sign in front of a house or business carrying the conventional form by which its location is described

Related Words

the stance assumed by a golfer in preparation for hitting a golf ball

Related Words

social skill

Synonyms

Related Words

give a speech to

put an address on (an envelope)

direct a question at someone

address or apply oneself to something, direct one's efforts towards something, such as a question

greet, as with a prescribed form, title, or name

Synonyms

access or locate by address

adjust and aim (a golf ball) at in preparation of hitting

References in periodicals archive ?
Quite often a communication act may be untimely or not to the point, thus negatively influencing the addresser and causing his confrontation tune which may imbalance further course of conversation and bring it to a stop.
Third, Jacobson assumes that the selfhood of the addresser and addressee are pre-given.
So as soon as the encoding process comes into view, we see the implied author in the role of the addresser in the communication model of narrative.
Compared to this, the presence of the lyrical "I" in "Byzantium" is extremely limited, and allows no further inference about its position than that of the addresser of the text.
Roman Jakobson's model involves an addresser, an addressee, coding and decoding of a message, etc.
Neither doing full justice to Ricoeur's refined theory, nor to the notions of "split addresser and addressee" introduced by Jakobson, I will concentrate on "split reference" in the above sense.
Presuppositions and inferences as a case of tensions between an addresser and an addressee in literary communication have been subtly analyzed by Glowinski ("Komunikacja literacka").
It is assumed that these example sentences would be totally unintelligible, if there were not a pragmatically governed pre-condition which can be specified as there is an intentionally conveyed meaning that the addressee knows what the addresser implies here by
This point of view, says Hantzis, generates an "alternating pattern of identification and displacement" in which the reader is both drawn into the text when he or she identifies (and identifies with) the addresser and addressee of the "you," and expelled again when their identities slide and make identification untenable.
In the present study, the participant context is basically twofold: addresser and addressee.
Even though the narrator is obviously the insubstantial invention of the author, pragmatic meaning construction remains very firmly predicated on the assumption of an addresser observing the maxims of cooperation in human communication.
Second-person narratives, in so far as a speaker or addresser emerges from the text, moreover, tend to move along and across another boundary line, that between the discourse and the story.
Communication theory has long accustomed us to think of any interchange as consisting of three main components: addresser, message, addressee, where addresser and addressee normally and regularly switch roles.
By the sudden introduction of "you" in the text, the narrative center in [4-S] is shifted to the Addresser 3-Addressee 3 level from the Addresser 4-Addressee 4 level, which is foregrounded in [4-L].
So, working with the archive means a constant exposure to germs, mold, dust and mites and to protect yourself you have to wear a mask and surgical gloves--the researchers and the addressers have to wear them also.