action

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Synonyms for action

Synonyms for action

the process of doing

Synonyms

something done

the manner in which one behaves

a legal proceeding to demand justice or enforce a right

a hostile encounter between opposing military forces

Synonyms for action

a process existing in or produced by nature (rather than by the intent of human beings)

the series of events that form a plot

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the trait of being active and energetic and forceful

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the operating part that transmits power to a mechanism

an act by a government body or supranational organization

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the most important or interesting work or activity in a specific area or field

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institute legal proceedings against

References in classic literature ?
3) Dramatic, including not merely the drama but all poetry of vigorous action.
Pope Julius the Second went to work impetuously in all his affairs, and found the times and circumstances conform so well to that line of action that he always met with success.
Hence, we may conclude, that domestic instincts have been acquired and natural instincts have been lost partly by habit, and partly by man selecting and accumulating during successive generations, peculiar mental habits and actions, which at first appeared from what we must in our ignorance call an accident.
One of the strongest instances of an animal apparently performing an action for the sole good of another, with which I am acquainted, is that of aphides voluntarily yielding their sweet excretion to ants: that they do so voluntarily, the following facts show.
As some degree of variation in instincts under a state of nature, and the inheritance of such variations, are indispensable for the action of natural selection, as many instances as possible ought to have been here given; but want of space prevents me.
We therefore look for some other interpretation of our actions, and regard our friends as very unjust when they refuse to be convinced by our repudiation of what we hold to be a calumny.
The connection of dreams, irrational beliefs and foolish actions with unconscious wishes has been brought to light, though with some exaggeration, by Freud and Jung and their followers.
What, I think, is clearly established, is that a man's actions and beliefs may be wholly dominated by a desire of which he is quite unconscious, and which he indignantly repudiates when it is suggested to him.
Returning from this digression to our main topic, namely, the criticism of "consciousness," we observe that Freud and his followers, though they have demonstrated beyond dispute the immense importance of "unconscious" desires in determining our actions and beliefs, have not attempted the task of telling us what an "unconscious" desire actually is, and have thus invested their doctrine with an air of mystery and mythology which forms a large part of its popular attractiveness.
The followers of Descartes held that mind and matter are so different as to make any action of the one on the other impossible.
There is, it is true, one objection which might be felt, not indeed to the action of matter on mind, but to the action of mind on matter.
In this action for the first time trophies were taken: banners, cannon, and two enemy generals.
Prince Andrew during the battle had been in attendance on the Austrian General Schmidt, who was killed in the action.
Prince Andrew told his driver to stop, and asked a soldier in what action they had been wounded.
If the case be put of a partridge, there can be no doubt but an action would lie; for though this be