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Lepsius in fact helped to establish the school of analysis against which Winkler takes dead aim: the "milieu-theorists," as he acidly calls them, who believe that the stability of the party system was dependent on persistent socio-cultural milieux that supported the major party groupings over the long term.
We should not underestimate the scale of achievement," Chomsky writes acidly.
He acidly refutes the arguments for "Islamic science" put forward by Maurice Buccaille, Seyyed Hossein Nasr, and Ziauddin Sardar.
acidly notes, with particular reference to some recent discussions of Deut.
She observed acidly in October 1902: "It is part of the weariness of Halifax life, this constant explaining it to new people and apologising for its deficiencies--for of course, in contrast to the comfort of English life, there are no deficiencies.
The difficulty was acidly stated by George Bernard Shaw in his introduction to the (aptly titled) Doctor's Dilemma:
Software Futures is witty, acidly so, irreverent, but it knows its stuff.
In the weeks after the article social media was filled with North East people posting stunning pictures of the Tyne bridges, or Durham, or the Northumberland coast and commenting acidly that "Detroit" wasn't looking too shabby, was it?
Turning you into a half-decent footballer would be a miracle too far, however," he added acidly.
Unsurprisingly, the stunt prompted howls of laughter amongst Russia s increasingly confident opposition bloggers, who acidly noted that on his first flight Putin failed to persuade the cranes to follow him.
He can poke some fun at the people in the city as well, but that's nothing compared with his inclusion of "The Future" by Leonard Cohen, a song that's acidly satiric even by Cohen's high standards in that genre.
These laws were enacted and enforced in blatant violation of the freedmen's rights, although as Douglass acidly remarked in 1872, "The trouble never was in the Constitution, but in the administration of the Constitution.
Mad Dogs And Englishmen by Noel Coward, for instance, is acidly amusing.
The pictures' often blurred and acidly colored images are the product of successive generations of repro, giving the backgrounds a sense of distance in time and space, contrasting with the manic urgency of the felt-tip writing as well as the interruptive sticker details and the ragged frames of duct tape.