acetabulum

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Related to acetabula: hip joint
  • noun

Synonyms for acetabulum

the cup-shaped hollow in the hipbone into which the head of the femur fits to form a ball-and-socket joint

References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, at each test station, with the endoprosthesis installed in it, the force is applied vertically (as a rule, to the acetabula component) by means of individual pneumo- or the hydro cylinder.
Genital acetabula many pairs; female genital field with two pairs of acetabular plates; anterior female plates with an elongate, inner flap that is heavily sclerotized and bears one or two, short, thick, spinous, setae; posterior female plate modified with many acetabula; pedipalp subcylindrical and well-sclerotized with tarsus usually nearly quadrate in outline with large, obvious clawlets; most species with obvious dorsal plates; male genital field as in Pentatax Thor; first walking legs with large prominent setae; male fourth walking leg modified in some species; tarsal claws of walking legs deeply bifid in some species; coxal plates with obvious borders.
The method of disarticulation is also unusual: the ribs and the ilium appear to have been cut or snapped rather than cleanly chopped, the basal coracoids are only slightly damaged although the sternum is missing, no damage is visible related to the removal of the tibiotarsus from the proximal tarsometatarsus, and single cut-marks are visible on one of the acetabula where the femur was evidently removed.
Vertical loading on an acetabula component (cup) with the maximal value of 3kN on each test station is created on all stations of each block through two-arm lever mechanism with the certain reduction ratio by the electromechanical axis including a servomotor with a reducer and a drive with a toothed belt.
Obturator hernias protrude through the obturator foramina, which are located in the anterolateral pelvic wall bilaterally immediately inferior to the acetabula (Figure 5).