accidence


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Related to accidence: accedence, exceedance, Inflections
  • noun

Synonyms for accidence

the part of grammar that deals with the inflections of words

References in periodicals archive ?
The language of the elegy is not Devonian but the southern standard tongue, and the author's linguistic habits--diction, grammatical accidence, syntax, source material--are demonstrably unlike those of Simon Wastell or William Sclater.
In this way, gender and race seem to be more fundamental human characteristics and can be defined as the substance in this sense, while nationality has rather a status of accidence.
a graduate of Middlebury College, one of those sound, ancient little colleges at the mere name of which you hear elms rustle and almost possesses the Latin accidence, he read law, edited a paper, amused himself by running twice as the Democratic candidate for Governor, a test of humor in a state whose Democratic Party could be assembled in George Stearns's back garden.
Johnson, Ralph 1665 The scholars guide from the accidence to the university, or short, plain, and easie rules for performing all manner of exercise in the grammar school.
And by accidence or coincidence, a high profile symposium was organised shortly after the statement by Future Trends Foundation (an independent, albeit NCP funded, think-tank) in collaboration with UNIMISS, debated questions that must urgently be addressed regarding post-referendum Sudan -- should it emerge as one united country, or as two sovereign states.
They asked whether hospitals routinely checked with social service departments to see whether children admitted to accidence and emergency departments were subject to child protection plans.
It is likely that innovations in worker safety technologies or increased public concern over such accidents would cause changes to accidence avoidance costs.
a place where the individual man can form new synthesis, where the accidence of friendship and association can open a man's eyes to a part of human life remote and perhaps superficially incompatible, which can form in men their harmony and their synthesis" (Cf.
Morris believed, for example, that translations into modern European languages should reject elegant paraphrase in favor of direct speech, inflected by traces of the accidence of their ancient originals, and that classical epics belonged not to a lone genius or even a lineage of transcribers, but to "the people of that time, who were the real authors of the Homeric poems.
His soliloquies on fate and historical accidence, delivered to an overwrought Monty Bodkin, are among the best things that Wodehouse ever wrote.