matter

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Related to a matter of course: come in handy, take account of, so much for
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  • noun
  • verb
  • phrase

Synonyms for matter

be important

Synonyms

as a matter of fact

Synonyms

no matter

Synonyms

  • don't worry about it
  • never mind
  • it doesn't matter
  • don't apologise
  • it makes no difference or odds

Synonyms for matter

that which occupies space and can be perceived by the senses

that from which things are or can be made

what a speech, piece of writing, or artistic work is about

something to be done, considered, or dealt with

to be of significance or importance

Synonyms for matter

References in classic literature ?
Sounding almost all the harmonies of the modern lyre, he has, perhaps as a matter of course, some of the faults also, the "spasmodic" and other lapses, which from age to age, in successive changes of taste, have been the "defects" of excellent good "qualities.
But for this, while I should chide him I cannot do so, for of all the ways David has of making me to love him the most poignant is that he expects it of me as a matter of course.
As a matter of course, one was a boy, the other a girl, the former being called Cornelius, the other Rosa.
We leaped ten or fifteen-foot gaps as a matter of course.
The security (covering the amount borrowed) was accepted as a matter of course.
I had read sea-romances in my time, wherein figured, as a matter of course, the lone woman in the midst of a shipload of men; but I learned, now, that I had never comprehended the deeper significance of such a situation--the thing the writers harped upon and exploited so thoroughly.
Quite as a matter of course, Pollyanna came straight to her aunt's side and gave her an affectionate hug.
I had long since learnt to understand, composedly and as a matter of course, that my situation in life was considered a guarantee against any of my female pupils feeling more than the most ordinary interest in me, and that I was admitted among beautiful and captivating women much as a harmless domestic animal is admitted among them.
She took Jos's arm, as a matter of course, on going to dinner; she had sate by him on the box of his open carriage (a most tremendous "buck" he was, as he sat there, serene, in state, driving his greys), and though nobody said a word on the subject of the marriage, everybody seemed to understand it.