Wordsworth

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Synonyms for Wordsworth

a romantic English poet whose work was inspired by the Lake District where he spent most of his life (1770-1850)

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35) A Burkean veneration of custom (sometimes figured as "second nature") is detected by Chandler in practically the entire Wordsworthian corpus.
This synecdoche for the foreign is also, ironically, a synecdoche for the Wordsworthian pastoral, a mode that had become, by this date, a stereotype for the association of landscape with Englishness.
The problem today is what to make of Wordsworthian nature, which has long been severed from the socius and can no longer, it seems, function as an allegory of social disaffection and inequality?
Not because I was precociously spiritual, unless you mean I had access to that natural Wordsworthian spirituality all children are receptive to if they're given half the chance.
He goes on to describe in similarly perspicuous language the urgent need for reflection that this early encounter with his life's work inspired in him and his escapes into the Wordsworthian landscapes of his Lake District boyhood to indulge that need, which began to make his parents think that "I had fallen into a habit of loafing"--a part of the story that his biographer reduces to paraphrase as follows:
Fairer's exciting reading of the Wordsworthian landscape draws on a distinction between pastoral and georgic modes.
AoIt was almost Wordsworthian in nature Au peaceful and clam.
The dimensions of space are, so to speak, leaking into each other, and this accounts at once for the Wordsworthian intimations so many have felt and the appearance of the alien spacecraft that has, indeed, been dimension-hopping, one of those dimensions being ours.
Take "Glory Days," from Born in the USA for instance, a two-step rocker that sounds like a bland celebration and is actually a withering complaint about aging, one that offers no Wordsworthian consolation.
The volume is replete with nature imagery "gone wrong" as the return home does not yield the Wordsworthian peace and tranquility that memory promises.
Matthew Arnold, a disciple of Wordsworth and Goethe, and "the one major Victorian writer of whom it can be said without metaphor that he was nurtured in the Wordsworthian presence" (Gill 174), asks England and Europe to remember his mentor in his celebrated "Memorial Verses" read at Wordsworth's graveside: "Ah
Tacitly alluding to Abrams's Natural Supernaturalism (which he had explicitly cited in his 1992 paper), he calls Lilith MacDonald's Wordsworthian "high argument"--"an invented myth based on Christian allegory" (23).
No Wordsworthian drop-off, she still has full control of her poetic powers when she needs them most.
Perhaps it is this Wordsworthian aversion to capriciousness that typifies the North Dakotan mind-set: leave well enough alone and "git-r-done.