William I

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Synonyms for William I

duke of Normandy who led the Norman invasion of England and became the first Norman to be King of England

References in classic literature ?
So William, whom I had favoured in so many ways, was a married man.
I gathered that the troublesome woman was ailing, and as one who likes after dinner to believe that there is no distress in the world, I desired to be told by William that the signals meant her return to health.
Brother," said William, "how do I know what you may have done in the secret chambers of your heart, to give Satan an advantage over you?
At last, when everyone rose to depart, he went towards William Dane and said, in a voice shaken by agitation--
Now I may say that even I could not require William Price to excite a greater interest, or be followed by warmer wishes and higher commendation, than were most voluntarily bestowed by my uncle after the evening they had passed together.
When she did understand it, however, and found herself expected to believe that she had created sensations which his heart had never known before, and that everything he had done for William was to be placed to the account of his excessive and unequalled attachment to her, she was exceedingly distressed, and for some moments unable to speak.
William rose also, and stood in front of the fire, muttering, "Oysters, oysters--your basket of oysters
I should have thought that you never forgot anything," William remarked, as they settled down again.
But we retained our rifles, every man--Ramon Gallegos, William Shaw, George W.
Then William Shaw said: 'I should like to look like that--a little while.
Some surprise had been expressed that a person of Colonel Joliffe's known Whig principles, though now too old to take an active part in the contest, should have remained in Boston during the siege, and especially that he should consent to show himself in the mansion of Sir William Howe.
1 contained the belief that James Williams was about the right sort of thing.
In his youth Wash Williams had been called the best telegraph operator in the state, and in spite of his degradement to the obscure office at Winesburg, he was still proud of his ability.
Why, that little sneak, Arthur's," replied Williams.
However, the wilderness was wide enough; so Roger Williams took his staff and travelled into the forest and made treaties with the Indians, and began a plantation which he called Providence.