Vinca minor


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  • noun

Synonyms for Vinca minor

widely cultivated as a groundcover for its dark green shiny leaves and usually blue-violet flowers

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References in periodicals archive ?
opulus highbush cranberry Vinca minor periwinkle x More Invasive Scientific name recent rank Origin Trees Acer platanoides x high Eurasia Ailanthus altissima x high Asia Alnus glutinosa (D,K,P) x high Eurasia/N.
Vinca minor L (lesser periwinkle) is a plant in the Apocynaceae family that is native to central and southern Europe and southwestern Asia, and is cultivated in the United States and other countries as a ground cover.
The shopping list included one Amelanchier, one Cornus mas, five Viburnum, three Cornus alba, five Hydrangea macrophylla, three Hydrangea quercifolia, five Leucothoe, three Clethra, 12 Heuchera, 12 Liriope, 12 Athyrium, one Vinca minor, three Microbiota, six Pieris japonica, one Betula nigra, three Chamaecyparis `Pendula,' nine Astilbe and six Hakonechloa.
In the spring, lenten roses or lungwort would look good, or some blue vinca minor.
Competitive Mechanisms of Vinca minor, an Invasive Groundcover, in a Michigan Beech-Maple Forest.
Vinca minor (periwinkle) will carpet the ground as will most ivies, some geraniums (G.
THE evergreen lesser periwinkle, Vinca minor, forms a ground-hugging mat of glossy green leaves and violet-blue flowers.
Low growing geraniums, pachysandra and vinca minor are all pretty trouble free and would grow easily under large shrubs, he says.
He says low-growing geraniums pachysandra and vinca minor are all pretty trouble-free and would grow easily under large shrubs.
Vinca major is considered to be a wild mutation of Vinca minor.
These miniature bulbs are perfect for planting through low-growing ground covers such as ajuga, violets, Vinca minor and English ivy.
Lesser periwinkle, Vinca minor, was used together with roses and myrtle, Myrtus communis, in wreaths and garlands, especially for weddings.