vigilante

(redirected from Vigilante justice)
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  • noun

Synonyms for vigilante

member of a vigilance committee

References in periodicals archive ?
Although the video asks citizens for information that would lead to judicial action against the suspects, Abdel Latif would not comment on what was being done to ensure that the alleged terrorists will not be subjected to vigilante justice.
Paul Kersey, played by Charles Bronson for the final time, is back dishing out vigilante justice when his fiancee, Olivia, has her business threatened by mobsters.
Editor Pfeifer has assembled a collection of very compelling and readable case studies that interrogates not only the sources of vigilante justice, but also the persistence of such events within popular memory and the problems which inhere in commemoration, reconciliation, and even constitutionalism.
It was a form of vigilante justice known as "necklacing".
While caught up in a pawn shop robbery, he finally snaps and takes up a shotgun to unleash his own brand of lethal vigilante justice.
He then threatened the rest of the cast in tweets which read: "really hope some vigilante justice is done
BOSTON -- Ryan Dempster is Canadian, but the American League is not the NHL, where vigilante justice is a way of life and players settle things among themselves.
Yet this is not an opportunity for vigilante justice.
Let us continue to refuse to be silent until all the George Zimmermans of this world are deterred and held accountable for vigilante justice against Black males.
Why do people resort to vigilante justice on thugs and outlaws?
Put it this way: no one resorted to vigilante justice at the end of the trial, but a lot of us vowed never to watch another Naked Gun movie.
According to The Economist, the armed forces of Pakiostan are perpetuating vigilante justice with the help of a sweeping law passed in 2011 -- Actions in Aid of Civil Power Regulation-which allows the them to hold suspects for unlimited periods, and even execute them.
It will also preclude the rise of vigilante justice with people taking the law into their own hands.
In Erdrich's hands, you may find yourself, as I did, embracing the prospect of vigilante justice as regrettable but reasonable, a way to connect to timeless wisdom about human behavior.