tuberose

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Related to Tuberoses: Polianthes tuberosa
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Synonyms for tuberose

a tuberous Mexican herb having grasslike leaves and cultivated for its spikes of highly fragrant lily-like waxy white flowers

References in periodicals archive ?
The tuberose was a new plant brought to Versailles from Mexico, and was considered to have the power to awaken erotic desire.
You won't be disappointed, and combined in a vase with a few tuberoses, you have a breath-taking and fragrant masterpiece.
There, after tilling and amending the soil, he planted roses, perennials, and a smattering of seasonal tubers, such as dahlias and tuberoses.
1928 featuring white roses, jasmine, tuberoses, lily of the valley,
She carried a hand-tied bouquet of white roses, hydrangeas, lilies, calla lilies, lilies of the valley, stars of Bethlehem, tuberoses, and sweet peas, along with dried flowers from her mother's bouquet and an emerald pendant from her late grandmother.
Owing to the favourable weather, other than jasmine, tuberoses, roses, marigolds, chrysanthemums are also grown in the area.
She raised flowers and her pride an joy were her tuberoses, a very
Dahlias, gladiolus, crocosmias, and tuberoses are a breeze too--they're as effortless as their spring-blooming cousins.
At high elevations, look for desert lavender, tuberoses, popcorn flowers, Indian paintbrush, desert lilies and dune sunflowers.
She carried a bouquet of white calla lilies and tuberoses.
Other tubers and bulbs that can be planted right now for a spectacular summer show are tuberoses, calla lilies, cannas, gladioluses (or gladiolas), tigridia, dahlias and lilies.
What's in bloom: dahlias, tuberoses, warm-season annuals, heat-loving perennials.
She carried a bouquet of taupe, champagne, and creme-toned pristine roses, tuberoses, orchid blooms, and calla lilies hand-tied with a double satin ribbon.
Tuberoses (Polianthes tuberosa), which are slowly regaining the popularity they had in the Victorian era, have the stronger fragrance--a bit like the gardenia's--but are somewhat gawky when surrounded with low-growing plants (small flowers cluster atop a straight stalk).
She carried a hand-tied bouquet of white Virginia roses, tuberoses, stock, Porcelana spray roses, freesia, and lily of the valley.