Theseus


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Related to Theseus: Perseus
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(Greek mythology) a hero and king of Athens who was noted for his many great deeds: killed Procrustes and the Minotaur and defeated the Amazons and united Attica

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References in classic literature ?
So, when the king asked what he should do with Theseus, this naughty woman had an answer ready at her tongue's end.
As she said this, Medea smiled; but, for all her smiling face, she meant nothing less than to poison the poor innocent Theseus, before his father's eyes.
When Theseus was ushered into the royal apartment, the only object that he seemed to behold was the white-bearded old king.
And therefore, unless he could have laid his full, over- brimming heart into the king's hand, poor Theseus knew not what to do or say.
He made up his mind, therefore, to let Theseus drink off the poisoned wine.
So saying, King Aegeus took the golden goblet from the table, and was about to offer it to Theseus.
He sat erect on his throne, and held out the goblet of wine with a steady hand, and bent on Theseus a frown of kingly severity; for, after all, he had too noble a spirit to murder even a treacherous enemy with a deceitful smile upon his face.
It was my father's sword," replied Theseus, with a tremulous voice.
cried King Aegeus, flinging away the fatal goblet, and tottering down from the throne to fall into the arms of Theseus.
And now Prince Theseus was taken into great favor by his royal father.
One morning, when Prince Theseus awoke, he fancied that he must have had a very sorrowful dream, and that it was still running in his mind, even now that his eyes were opened.
But King Aegeus shook his venerable head, and to convince Theseus that it was quite a hopeless case, he gave him an explanation of the whole affair.
But when Theseus heard the story, he straightened himself up, so that he seemed taller than ever before; and as for his face it was indignant, despiteful, bold, tender, and compassionate, all in one look.
It is because I am a prince, your son, and the rightful heir of your kingdom, that I freely take upon me the calamity of your subjects," answered Theseus, " And you, my father, being king over these people, and answerable to Heaven for their welfare, are bound to sacrifice what is dearest to you, rather than that the son or daughter of the poorest citizen should come to any harm.
The old king shed tears, and besought Theseus not to leave him desolate in his old age, more especially as he had but just begun to know the happiness of possessing a good and valiant son.