pillory

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Synonyms for pillory

ridicule

Synonyms

Synonyms for pillory

a wooden instrument of punishment on a post with holes for the wrists and neck

expose to ridicule or public scorn

Synonyms

punish by putting in a pillory

criticize harshly or violently

References in periodicals archive ?
By the second decade of the 19th century, however, the pillory could no longer be deployed for such offences, and many of the posts must have then been taken down.
You can still stand on Pillory Green in Southam in Warwickshire, but can no longer be scourged; the pillory has long since made its exit.
For Daniel Defoe, the legitimate candidates for the pillory should not be the petty criminals, but the crooked bankers.
Perhaps the work of the pillory at Coleshill is not yet entirely done.
Author Daniel Defoe in the pillory, painted by James Charles Armitage.
Novak explains, "Addressing the pillory as if it were a sentient being, Defoe turned the poem to the subject of the villains in the society who really deserved to be punished.
Since the twelfth century, the pillory had meted out punishment for specific societal transgressions--"unnatural" sexual offenses, seditious words, extortion, fraud, and perjury.
19) In A True-Born Englishman and in Reformation of Manners, Satyr reforms others, while, notably, in More Reformation (published two weeks prior to A Hymn to the Pillory), Satyr is both reformed and reforms others, just as the Pillory does.
The hardened protagonist of the poem, the Pillory itself, is introduced to readers, through the opening salutation, "Hail
Most intriguingly, A Hymn to the Pillory possesses the same narrative structure as Defoe's novels (with the notable exception of The Fortunate Mistress, also known as Roxana (1724)).
However, somehow, the Pillory has been separated from Law and Justice, undoubtedly kidnapped by certain special interests, and it falls into evil ways, doing the bidding of specific "Parties" (26), becoming increasingly hardened to a life of crime; its true nature, its original upright character, has been perverted and inverted.
In its debased state, the Pillory proves itself to be a mere masquerader, a pretender to Law and Justice, suggesting the false nature of the entire English judicial, legal, and penal systems.
The pillory was used to punish minor offenders including cheats, liars, rioters and homosexuals, by shaming them in public.
The length of the stay in the pillory varied, but could last for several hours or even days.