union

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Synonyms for union

Synonyms for union

a bringing together into a whole

a group of people united in a relationship and having some interest, activity, or purpose in common

an association, especially of nations for a common cause

an identity or coincidence of interests, purposes, or sympathies among the members of a group

a point or position at which two or more things are joined

Synonyms for union

the United States (especially the northern states during the American Civil War)

healing process involving the growing together of the edges of a wound or the growing together of broken bones

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a political unit formed from previously independent people or organizations

a set containing all and only the members of two or more given sets

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a device on a national flag emblematic of the union of two or more sovereignties (typically in the upper inner corner)

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being of or having to do with the northern United States and those loyal to the Union during the American Civil War

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of trade unions

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References in classic literature ?
But if the destruction of the Union by one or by a part only of the States be lawfully possible, the Union is LESS perfect than before the Constitution, having lost the vital element of perpetuity.
I therefore consider that, in view of the Constitution and the laws, the Union is unbroken; and to the extent of my ability I shall take care, as the Constitution itself expressly enjoins upon me, that the laws of the Union be faithfully executed in all the States.
The mails, unless repelled, will continue to be furnished in all parts of the Union.
That we may form a juster estimate with regard to this interesting subject, let us resort to the actual dimensions of the Union.
A second observation to be made is that the immediate object of the federal Constitution is to secure the union of the thirteen primitive States, which we know to be practicable; and to add to them such other States as may arise in their own bosoms, or in their neighborhoods, which we cannot doubt to be equally practicable.
Let it be remarked, in the third place, that the intercourse throughout the Union will be facilitated by new improvements.
Even after the Union was accomplished Defoe remained in Scotland.
But Defoe assures his readers he means to go on writing about the Union until he can see some prospect of calm among the men who are trying to make dispeace.
They seem still to aim at things repugnant and irreconcilable; at an augmentation of federal authority, without a diminution of State authority; at sovereignty in the Union, and complete independence in the members.
Though this principle does not run through all the powers delegated to the Union, yet it pervades and governs those on which the efficacy of the rest depends.
But if we are unwilling to be placed in this perilous situation; if we still will adhere to the design of a national government, or, which is the same thing, of a superintending power, under the direction of a common council, we must resolve to incorporate into our plan those ingredients which may be considered as forming the characteristic difference between a league and a government; we must extend the authority of the Union to the persons of the citizens, -- the only proper objects of government.
And in the morning, when the twenty thousand men thronged into the yards, with their dinner pails and working clothes, Jurgis stood near the door of the hog-trimming room, where he had worked before the strike, and saw a throng of eager men, with a score or two of policemen watching them; and he saw a superintendent come out and walk down the line, and pick out man after man that pleased him; and one after another came, and there were some men up near the head of the line who were never picked--they being the union stewards and delegates, and the men Jurgis had heard making speeches at the meetings.
There was no one to picture the battle the union leaders were fighting--to hold this huge army in rank, to keep it from straggling and pillaging, to cheer and encourage and guide a hundred thousand people, of a dozen different tongues, through six long weeks of hunger and disappointment and despair.
They made an offer to submit the whole question at issue to arbitration; and at the end of ten days the unions accepted it, and the strike was called off.
One-eighth of the whole population were colored slaves, not distributed generally over the Union, but localized in the Southern part of it.
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