turning point

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  • noun

Synonyms for turning point

crossroads

Synonyms

Synonyms for turning point

Synonyms for turning point

an event marking a unique or important historical change of course or one on which important developments depend

the intersection of two streets

References in periodicals archive ?
The Turning Point Pregnancy Resource Center (TPPRC) offers free pregnancy medical services for women who are experiencing an unplanned pregnancy.
While filing at the BSE, the company stated, The Turning Point Scholarships have been introduced with an aim to recognize and reward meritorious students with scholarships to help them achieve their dream career options in IT industry.
The Turning Point home in Leamington was one of five where inspectors raised "major concerns".
For a holographic dark energy, the turning point redshift depends on a free parameter [22].
THE TURNING POINTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY by Frank Uekoetter (ed.
Regarding Vietnam, for instance, the turning point becomes a relatively amorphous "retrenchment in foreign policy, especially pertaining to far flung overseas adventures.
Zola said: "The team is playing better and this may well be the turning point.
Hackett insisted: "The disallowed goal was the turning point.
Lincoln at Peoria: The Turning Point is an in-depth, historical and critical analysis of Abraham Lincoln's three-hour speech delivered at Peoria on October 16, 1854.
Take heart in the major progress that is occurring around the world--that's where 2007 was the turning point.
CELTIC skipper Neil Lennon said last night that winning the title could be the turning point in Gordon Strachan's relationship with the fans.
Moreover, the results in Table 1 show that, using data from February 23 to April 4, or 10 days after the turning point of this phase, model fitting gives an estimate of K = 140.
I definitely think that was the turning point for us.
D-Day was not undoubtedly the turning point in World War II.
This is important, for if these revisions were large it would reduce the importance given to the initial dates identified by the switching model, making the improved timeliness of the turning point identification over the NBER less interesting.