symbology

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Words related to symbology

the study or the use of symbols and symbolism

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References in periodicals archive ?
A similar symbological approach was adopted in Vladimir Papernyi's important study of Stalin-era architecture, Kul'tura "Dva" (Ann Arbor: Ardis, 1985), also available in English as Architecture in theAge of Stalin: Culture Two, trans.
The symbological data is encoded in a series of "layers" that circle around a bulls-eye pattern.
Yes, said Duncan, the Guinness globe behind his head like a black moone, it's a matter of what attitude Poetry assumes before the social order: if one takes the latter as primary field, then one is scaffolded from within, ipso facto, by a closely spaced lattice of symbological struts; but if the social structure is made a small thing, something that can fit inside one's head, well, the area of poeisis suddenly becomes infinite and free.
He too undertakes a physical and figurative voyage of self-discovery, from Galicia to Madrid, then from the capital to surrounding Castile and the symbological city of Toledo, where he engages crucially with the immediate legacy of the writings of the Generation of 1898 and the weight of centripetal, imperial cultural history.
Despite his complex symbological system comprised of elements ranging from medieval history to Gnostic tracts and mythology, all marshaled in hopes of creating an alternative set of values, the meaningfulness of Duncan's work still depends on that which it opposes.
6) The producers of Kitsch extract a symbological rhetoric from the standing culture, according to Kulka: "We may distinguish between different types of kitsch of varying degrees of universality.
In his school's symbological system, the crow represented change, something new and good.
In a study of ritual meanings in Vanuatu, Michael Allen (1988) rejects symbological approaches to the subject, charging that they ignore the power dimension and suppose that ritual operates, cryptologically, to `communicate ideas, meanings, messages, or knowledge of social import' (p.