Stockholm

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  • noun

Synonyms for Stockholm

the capital and largest city of Sweden

References in periodicals archive ?
This, I thought was more compelling than just a book on Stockholm syndrome," she says.
Stockholm Syndrome is the psychological tendency of a hostage to bond with, identify with, or sympathize with his or her captor.
Okay, so it does have plot holes, and yes, we realise we, as are the Sanders' are experiencing a touch of Stockholm Syndrome where Duncan is concerned, but every single episode has us gripped until the end credits roll.
Perhaps they are suffering from Stockholm Syndrome," Bilawal said, referring to cases of hostages who sympathise with or even assist their captors.
It's a kind of domestic Stockholm Syndrome whereby a victim, although she knows that what's happening to her is wrong, becomes emotionally dependent on her oppressor.
Initially Julie is scared and repulsed by the situation, but eventually she begins to suffer from Stockholm Syndrome .
It could be the public policy equivalence of the Stockholm syndrome and I readily admit it.
This was exemplified in the way the curved bank of screens surrounding the stage were transformed into a giant roulette wheel to select whether the band play Stockholm Syndrome or New Born (on this occasion the former).
The psychological effects can include posttraumatic stress disorder, shame, denial, confusion, and depression, and victims may even develop traumatic bonding or Stockholm syndrome.
He said: "There's a bit of Stockholm syndrome going on.
Much like the Stockholm syndrome, where victims bond with their captors, people who give to Harvard are captives of the institution.
Currently at Safar Khan Gallery is artist Khaled Hafez's painting exhibition titled "On Codes, Symbols & Stockholm Syndrome.
We would like to suggest that we might also see Fanny as someone who is suffering from what today we would call the Stockholm Syndrome, the psychological response of those abducted hostages or prisoners who develop an intense loyalty to their captors, regardless of the danger or risk in which they have been placed.
I like to think that it was Stockholm syndrome - comedian/kidnapper and audience member/victim locked together in a dysfunctional but supportive embrace.
The authors discuss Stockholm Syndrome at length and why some people develop positive feelings toward their captors, and others do not.
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