spallation

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  • noun

Words related to spallation

(physics) a nuclear reaction in which a bombarded nucleus breaks up into many particles

References in periodicals archive ?
The experiment is carried out on a polarized cold neutron beam line at the spallation source SINQ described in detail in Ref.
Project development and construction group Skanska AB (STO:SKAB) announced on Friday the entering into a contract with European Spallation Source (ESS) to build the second stage of a state-of-the-art research facility in Lund, Sweden.
The facility, called the European Spallation Source (ESS), represents a major advance on the more usual nuclear reactor-based technology.
A typical neutron pulse width of the spallation source is [delta]t = 1 [micro]s.
When the European Spallation Source (ESS) is completed, it is thought that up to 4,000 scientists a year will use it to gain a unique insight into the atomic structure of materials, helping them to do everything from designing better engines to developing new drugs.
The Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University, will be investing in a collaborative robot (cobot) for rapid sample changes after thorough testing and programming at the instrument HEIMDAL at the European spallation source (ESS), Lund, Sweden.
Professor Colin Carlile is a leading experimental physicist currently playing a central role in the development of a major new research facility - the European Spallation Source (ESS) at Lund in Sweden.
Experimental efforts to develop intense UCN sources with solid deuterium (SD2) as a UCN converter material are carried out worldwide: the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) project for the beta decay asymmetry study at the pulsed spallation source where they recently recorded the highest UCN density [2], the PSI project to utilize the cyclotron spallation neutrons [3,4], and also the reactor SD2 experiment [5] and UCN source projects [6,7].
Zo Fisher of the European Spallation Source and Lund University; and Robert McKenna of the University of Florida.
Professor Colin Carlile, a leading experimental physicist, is currently playing a central role in the development of a major new research facility - the European Spallation Source (ESS) at Lund in Sweden.