Scythia

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Related to Scythians: Huns, Cimmerians
  • noun

Words related to Scythia

an ancient area of Eurasia extending from the Black Sea to the Aral Sea that was populated by Scythians from the eighth to the fourth century BC

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References in periodicals archive ?
59) Tryphon, a Bosporan nauarch of Cotys II, celebrated a victory over the Scythians in 123 and later in 193 Sauromates II of Bosporus (173/4-210/11) defeated the Sarmatian Siraci and Scythians somewhere east of the Strait of Kerch and brought the Crimean Tauri into a treaty, thus (as he claimed) rendering the sea free for voyages to Pontus and Bithynia.
In the third century, the great theologian Origen provided the following explanation for the resistance of Christians to certain legal systems: "Suppose that a man were living among the Scythians, whose laws are contrary to the divine law, and was compelled to live among them .
It begins with the invention of chariots and the domestication of horses to pull them and continues to the Scythians, Iranians, Greeks, Romans, Chinese, Attila the Hun, the Turkic tribes and states, the Vikings, the Muslims, the Mongols, and eventually the Russians and the European colonial states.
He apprised that from Alchamenian, it onwards came under the sway of many different influences and rulers namely Mauryans, Greeks, Scythians, Kushans, Sasanians, White Huns, Hindu Shahis, Ghaznavids, Slave Dynasty, Ghorids, Suri Afghans, Mughals, Durrani Afghans, Sikhs and the British before creation of Pakistan.
Ancient Scythians may have drunk enemy blood from them.
People usually think of ancient Egypt when they hear "mummies," but mummification was practiced by many cultures, including the Incas of Peru and the Scythians of Mongolia.
Mounted archery was a defining characteristic of Steppe warfare throughout Central Asia, and throughout the prairies of America after the adoption of the horse, used by peoples including the Scythians, Sarmatians, Parthians, Sassanids, Huns, Bulgars, Magyars, Mongols, Turks, Rajputs, Comanches, and others.
Saleh revealed that from Alchamenian, it onwards came under the sway of many different influences and rulers namely Mauryans, Greeks, Scythians, Kushans, Sasanians, White Huns, Hindu Shahis, Ghaznavids, Slave Dynasty, Ghorids, Suri Afghans, Mughals, Durrani Afghans, Sikhs and the British before creation of Pakistan.
The outsiders who invaded Taxila and later on got absorbed in its culture were the Achaemenid Persians (522 to 326BC), Alexander of Macedonia (326BC), Scythians and Parthians (90BC) and Kushana (2nd CenturyBC).
He campaigned against implacable barbarian foes such as the Scythians and the great Greek powers of his day, Athens and Thebes.
6) Both these types of language sound "ungrammatical" to speakers of the standard dialect, perhaps in the same way that the Sauromatae dialect sounded "incorrect" to the Scythians.
Meserve's first chapter, "The Rise and Fall of the Trojan Turks," helpfully guides the reader through some of the theories that humanists (mostly Italian, but with the mention of occasional Englishman and Frenchman) entertained regarding the origins of the Turks and other eastern peoples held to be related to the Turks, such as the Scythians.
13) Equally, we might suppose, with RAPSON, that the Indo Scythians, Indo-Parthians and the Kushans used the Parthian Macedonian calendar in light of their Parthian background and the close connections between them.
The description of the Babylonian cavalry maneuvers in 1:8-9, followed by a description of their siege tactics in 1:10 (item 3) recalls the successful attack by the Medes and Scythians on Nineveh.