Sahaptin


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Related to Sahaptin: Yakima, Yakama Nation
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Synonyms for Sahaptin

a member of a North American Indian people who lived in Oregon along the Columbia river and its tributaries in Washington and northern Idaho

a Penutian language spoken by the Shahaptian

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References in periodicals archive ?
Marilyn Goudy, a Yakama woman, formerly a teacher's aid, became the first Heritage student to major in Sahaptin, the Yakama language, and now integrates Yakama culture into her curriculum as a seventh and eighth-grade teacher in Toppenish schools.
As fashion accessories among tribes of the Columbia Plateau, historic photographs and collection data show beaded headbands and crowns being more popular among the Salish and central Plateau groups than among the Sahaptin speakers and southern Plateau women who preferred basket hats and scarves for headgear, that is until the 1930s when beaded crown-shaped headbands became accepted.
Viles is taking Yakama Sahaptin, one of a family of American Indian languages spoken along the Columbia River and offered for the first time this year at the UO.
CONFEDERATED TRIBES OF THE WARM SPRINGS RESERVATION OF OREGON, DECLARATION OF SOVEREIGNTY (1992) (on file with author) ("For millennia, Warm Springs people followed an elaborate structure of sovereign tribal responsibilities embodied in the Sahaptin phrase, tee-cha-meengsh-mee sin-wit na-me- ah-wa-ta-man-wit, which means `at the time of creation the Creator placed us in this land and He gave us the voice of this land and that is our law.
Compared to Sahaptin speaking tribes like the Nimi'ipuu (Nez Perce), most Salish speaking people, for their collective population and territorial range, have been victims of lack of study and under-documentation.
Language institute participants from the Yakama, Wasco, Warm Springs, Paiute and Klamath tribes learned language-teaching techniques from Tony Johnson, director of the Grand Ronde Chinuk Wawa immersion program, and Yakama elder Virginia Beavert, who teaches Sahaptin.