rhetoric

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Synonyms for rhetoric

Synonyms for rhetoric

the art of public speaking

Synonyms for rhetoric

using language effectively to please or persuade

study of the technique and rules for using language effectively (especially in public speaking)

References in classic literature ?
The words flowed from his pen, though he broke off from the writing frequently to look up definitions in the dictionary or to refer to the rhetoric.
The first part commences with an apology for his colloquial style; he is, as he has always been, the enemy of rhetoric, and knows of no rhetoric but truth; he will not falsify his character by making a speech.
But when he heard the rowdies in the streets singing the love- songs of Abelard to Heloise, the case was too plain--love-songs come not properly within the teachings of rhetoric and philosophy.
But it was not the speech of a one- hundred-thousand-dollar lawyer, nor was the rhetoric old-fashioned.
He was on his feet, flinging his arms, his rhetoric, and his control to the winds, alternately abusing Ernest for his youth and demagoguery, and savagely attacking the working class, elaborating its inefficiency and worthlessness.
This band of grandees, Hermes, Heraclitus, Empedocles, Plato, Plotinus, Olympiodorus, Proclus, Synesius and the rest, have somewhat so vast in their logic, so primary in their thinking, that it seems antecedent to all the ordinary distinctions of rhetoric and literature, and to be at once poetry and music and dancing and astronomy and mathematics.
I am sure that I produced a rhetoric as artificial and treated of things as unreal as my master in the art, and I am rather glad that I acquainted myself so thoroughly with a mood of literature which, whatever we may say against it, seems to have expressed very perfectly a mood of civilization.
While rhetorics of motherhood and family have been problematized within First Lady studies, the use of such rhetorics has proven to be a powerful tool for women in politics.
As has become clear, from Andrea Lunsford's edited collection Reclaiming Rhetorica: Women in the Rhetorical Tradition (1995) and Cheryl Glenn's monograph Rhetoric Retold: Regendering the Tradition from Antiquity Through the Renaissance (1997) to Joy Ritchie and Kate Ronald's anthology Available Means (2001) and Lindal Buchanan and Kathleen Ryan's Walking and Talking Feminist Rhetorics (2010), as a techne, rhetoric itself may well be predicated upon the social division of gender roles.
He and other ethnographers opened pathways to cross-cultural rhetorical study, as did Robert Oliver (1971) in a different way, evidenced in his important early comparative study of ancient non-Western rhetorics.
Though this leaves unexplored substantial portions of the art of rhetoric, Lyne's focus on tropes is not in itself unexpected: Renaissance rhetorics confine themselves ever more exclusively on style at the expense of the other parts of rhetoric, beginning the long process of what Gerard Genette called the "tropological reduction," whereby the art of rhetoric was eventually reduced to a theory of tropes.
Peter Mack's A History of Renaissance Rhetoric 1380-1620 presents a detailed account of the rhetorics published during the mentioned dates.
According to Darsey, rhetorics of radical reform that rely on this prophetic tradition are less interested in adapting truth to an audience through practical application of the means of persuasion than in bringing "the practice of the people into accord with a sacred principle" though an "uncompromising, often excoriating stance toward a reluctant audience.
Edited by Ernest Stromberg (associate professor in the Department of English, Communication and Journalism at California State University), American Indian Rhetorics Survivance: Word Medicine, Word Magic is an anthology of scholarly essays by learned authors discussing the rhetorical techniques and strategies of Native Americans in general terms.
Rhetorics of Display (2006) for the most recent scholarly publication extending rhetoric's scope to non-discursive domains of rhetorical influence.