figure of speech

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Related to Rhetorical figure: rhetorical device, figures of speech
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In her reading of The Making of Americans, Wasser highlights Stein's use of tautology, a rhetorical figure often derided as "both an aesthetic failing--a lack of novelty--and an epistemological failing--an empty claim" (143).
While one of the excerpts discussed in detail by Colosimo (lines 929-38) contains four examples of polyptoton, she does not examine that rhetorical figure closely.
Phillips and McQuarrie propose a new typology that distinguishes nine types of visual rhetorical figures according to their degree of complexity and ambiguity, and derive empirically testable predictions concerning how these different types of visual figures may influence such consumer responses as elaboration and belief change.
Identifying a central and definitive rhetorical figure to explain the structure of a work of art aligns my investigation with tropology.
And while most of Kuchar's attention may be given over to a single rhetorical figure--hyperbole--understanding that particular rhetorical figure is critical in the ongoing effort to understand the relationship between religion and thought in the modern world, an effort that involves the work of (at the very least) Martin Heidegger, Georges Bataille, Emmanuel Levinas, Michel Foucault, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Jacques Derrida, Slavoj Zizek, Alain Badiou, and Jean-Luc Marion.
Drawing on rhetoric (classical, nineteenth-century, and modern) and narratology, Georges Kliebenstein seeks to uncover the rhetorical figures that underlie the narratives of Stendhal, both fictional and biographical.
Very crudely, Kames's method was first to define the main characteristics of the passions (through introspection), then the main features of each major rhetorical figure, and then to compare the two in a given passage to see whether they coincide or not.
I hope that we--as technical editors--would also know that Caesar was using a rhetorical figure, asyndeton, in which an enumeration of elements is listed without conjunctions.
Moreover, the "metaphor" of giving oneself to be eaten, to nourish the bodies of those who are destitute is, for Weil, considerably more than a mere rhetorical figure.
Similarly, Paul De Man's critique of autobiography as a futile attempt at self-understanding through the dominant rhetorical figure of prosopopoeia, an illusory reconstruction of a self, has made for a variety of penetrating discussions and theories of autobiography in the last two decades or so, most of which are elucidated by Loureiro as he assimilates them into his own contribution to his palpitating questions.
For example, the current Benson & Hedges Cigarette campaign employs the rhetorical figure, personification (Pullack, 1997), and was preceded with campaigns employing other rhetorical figures, puns, and resonance (see Figure 1).
On a more minor key, one wonders at numerous references to the rhetorical figure of concatenatio (from catena, a chain) as, invariably, `concatentio'.
I will then examine the generative structure of a specific rhetorical figure, the enthymeme, key both to Aristotle and to contemporary rhetorical theory.
30) He shows, for example, that Johannes Nucius casually describes homoioteleuton (in verbal rhetoric, the device whereby 'corresponding words [often at the end of a sequence of clauses or sentences] have similar endings'(31)) in terms of the quite different rhetorical figure aposiopesis, which means 'breaking off a sentence with the sense incomplete'.
Irony is, as you may recall, the literary and rhetorical figure that commonly depends upon an intended disjunction or gap between what is said of depicted and what is "really" meant.