Puritan

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Synonyms for Puritan

Synonyms for Puritan

a person who is too much concerned with being proper, modest, or righteous

Words related to Puritan

a member of a group of English Protestants who in the 16th and 17th centuries thought that the Protestant Reformation under Elizabeth was incomplete and advocated the simplification and regulation of forms of worship

Related Words

someone who adheres to strict religious principles

Related Words

a person excessively concerned about propriety and decorum

References in classic literature ?
He was a gentleman of great wealth, who agreed with the Puritans in their religious opinions," answered Grandfather.
One of the vessels in the fleet was that same Mayflower which had carried the Puritan Pilgrims to Plymouth.
He wore a black cloak, called a Geneva cloak, and had a black velvet cap, fitting close to his head, as was the fashion of almost all the Puritan clergymen.
These verses were not excellent--very far from it; but as it is well known, the Puritans did not pique themselves upon their poetry.
Her voice, of immense power and sublime expression, gave to the rude, unpolished poetry of these psalms a magic and an effect which the most exalted Puritans rarely found in the songs of their brethren, and which they were forced to ornament with all the resources of their imagination.
Come, come, calm yourself, Madame Puritan, or I'll remove you to a dungeon.
The way was therefore opened to the four friends with all sorts of Puritan congratulations.
As we no longer wear the sword of the gentleman we may as well have the head of the Puritan.
And smack of the Puritan to a frightful extent," said Aramis.
But the figure which most attracted the public eye, and stirred up the deepest feeling, was the Episcopal clergyman of King's Chapel, riding haughtily among the magistrates in his priestly vestments, the fitting representatives of prelacy and persecution, the union of church and state, and all those abominations which had driven the Puritans to the wilderness.
I have heard, that whenever the descendants of the Puritans are to show the spirit of their sires, the old man appears again.
A party of Indians -- in their savage finery of curiously embroidered deerskin robes, wampum-belts, red and yellow ochre, and feathers, and armed with the bow and arrow and stone-headed spear -- stood apart with countenances of inflexible gravity, beyond what even the Puritan aspect could attain.
Thus the Puritan elders in their black cloaks, starched bands, and steeple-crowned hats, smiled not unbenignantly at the clamour and rude deportment of these jolly seafaring men; and it excited neither surprise nor animadversion when so reputable a citizen as old Roger Chillingworth, the physician, was seen to enter the market-place in close and familiar talk with the commander of the questionable vessel.
Without absolutely expressing a doubt whether the stalwart Puritan had acted as a man of conscience and integrity throughout the proceedings which have been sketched, they, nevertheless, hinted that he was about to build his house over an unquiet grave.
But the Puritan soldier and magistrate was not a man to be turned aside from his well-considered scheme, either by dread of the wizard's ghost, or by flimsy sentimentalities of any kind, however specious.