Ninurta


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  • noun

Synonyms for Ninurta

a solar deity

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References in periodicals archive ?
The use of a quotation and of allusions to similar passages as a means of conveying Marduk's superiority is also implied, for instance, in the substitution of Anu, Enlil, and Ea as the creators of cosmic order, in the depiction of Marduk as the mastermind of the creation of humankind instead of Ea, and in Marduk's use of a net to capture Ti'dmat as Ninurta had done with Anzil.
Review of An-gim dim-ma: The Return of Ninurta to Nippur, by J.
This romantic view remained unchallenged until the recent discovery of a text which speaks of a 'throne-dais |an emplacement for a divine statue~ which is situated in the chapel of the god Ninurta off the courtyard, on the north wall opposite the doorway', and identifies it with the dais of the god Asarre, an aspect of Marduk (George 1992: text no.
Another text, still unpublished, tells us that the statue of Asarre in the chapel of Ninurta was the third of seven statues of Marduk in Babylon, and that it was made of marhushu, an imported stone of some rarity.
In that case, in the OB version the Mother Goddess harnesses the storms, whereas in the SB version this is done by Ninurta himself, mummilat in 1.
Reimer, 1987), 429; Amar Annus, The God Ninurta in the Mythology and Royal Ideology of Ancient Mesopotamia (Helsinki: The Neo-Assyrian Text Corpus Project, 2002), 99.
That said, in other, more obscure contexts, Qingu does appear in the company of monsters: "[When Assur] s[ent Ninurta to vanquish] Anzu, Qingu and Asakku, [Nergal announced before Assur]: 'Anzu, Qingu and Asakku are vanquished,'" Alasdair Livingstone, "Marduk Ordeal (Nineveh Version).
This can be seen in the annals of Ashurnasirpal II, from the Ninurta temple at Calah, RIMA 2, A.
3) From the all-encompassing distance of that view, ranging (in the course of barely 40 lines) from the temples of Uruk to the court of Anu and then down to the wilderness, we are given the sight of an utterly natural being; thick hair on his body, long tresses like those of a woman, the strength of Ninurta within him as he eats grass along with the gazelle and jostles with other beasts at the water-hole.