mute

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Synonyms for mute

Synonyms for mute

temporarily unable or unwilling to speak, as from shock or fear

lacking the power or faculty of speech

to decrease or dull the sound of

to make or become less severe or extreme

Synonyms for mute

a deaf person who is unable to speak

a device used to soften the tone of a musical instrument

deaden (a sound or noise), especially by wrapping

expressed without speech

unable to speak because of hereditary deafness

References in periodicals archive ?
2012: Habitat at the mountain tops: how long can Rock Ptarmigan Lagopus muta helvetica survive rapid climate change in the Swiss Alps?
Lachesis muta muta venom: immunological differences compared with Bothrops atrox venom and importance of specific antivenom therapy.
432, 27-28: <<huius autem pedis si paenultima positione longa ita fuerit ut excipiatur tam ex muta quam ex liquida, accentus transfertur ad tertiam ab ultima, ut 'tenebrae' 'latebrae'>>; Serv.
The protest was triggered by bombing of an area in Ibrahimzi village of Muta Khan district on Tuesday.
MUTA OKWONGA is a lawyer and dedicated football fan who can claim to have produced a rarity - an intelligent football book.
One suspects that Muta Okwonga wouldn't be perturbed.
And Muta advises his clients to view their customers in the same manner.
Lo que diferenciaria a esta muta de Canetti de la mas conocida horda freudiana iria implicito en el termino elegido para designarla.
Included are Bertha von Suttner, who convinced Alfred Nobel to create the prize, and Jane Addams, professor Emily Greene Blach, Betty Williams and Maireand Corrigan, Mother Teresa, diplomat Alva Myrdal, Aung San Suu Kyi, Rigoberta Menchu Tum, landmine-banning activist Jody Williams, judge Shirin Ebadi, and doctor Wangari Muta Maathai.
Spend an evening with Wangari Muta Maathai, winner of the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize, in honor of Canopy's 10 years of educating the Palo Alto community in the stewardship of trees.
Keynote Speakers included Jackline Bitutu of Wananchi Online, Naomi Muta of UUNET, Eva Kimani of Celtel Kenya, Edgar Okioga of AfricaDotNet, and Nancy Macharia of The Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology.
Muta said at the symposium, sponsored by the American Heart Association.
Nickel subsulfide is genotoxia in vitro but shows no mutagenic potential in respiratory tract tissues of BigBlue rats and Muta
Louis highlighted the awarding of the Nobel Peace Prize to Kenyan Wangari Muta Maathai.