More


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Synonyms for More

a larger amount

Synonyms

  • a larger amount
  • extra
  • an increase
  • a supplement
  • an addition
  • a greater amount

to a greater extent

moreover

Synonyms

what's more

Synonyms for More

Synonyms for More

English statesman who opposed Henry VIII's divorce from Catherine of Aragon and was imprisoned and beheaded

(comparative of 'much' used with mass nouns) a quantifier meaning greater in size or amount or extent or degree

(comparative of 'many' used with count nouns) quantifier meaning greater in number

used to form the comparative of some adjectives and adverbs

comparative of much

Antonyms

References in classic literature ?
As it was the times that made More write his book, so it was the times that gave him the form of it.
Amerigo wrote a book about his voyages, and it was from this book that More got some of his ideas for the Utopia.
Ye may like work better nor play, but I like play better nor work; that'll 'commodate ye--it laves ye th' more to do.
Hitherto Gyp had kept his comfortable bed, only lifting up his head and watching Adam more closely as he noticed the other workmen departing.
This burst of confidence confirmed Rose in her purpose of winning Charlie's Mentor back to him, but she said no more, contented to have done so well.
And so, Master Marner, as I was saying--for there's windings i' things as they may carry you to the fur end o' the prayer-book afore you get back to 'em--my advice is, as you keep up your sperrits; for as for thinking you're a deep un, and ha' got more inside you nor 'ull bear daylight, I'm not o' that opinion at all, and so I tell the neighbours.
Winthrop was one of these: she was in all respects a woman of scrupulous conscience, so eager for duties that life seemed to offer them too scantily unless she rose at half-past four, though this threw a scarcity of work over the more advanced hours of the morning, which it was a constant problem with her to remove.
You are not my father, but some god is flattering me with vain hopes that I may grieve the more hereafter; no mortal man could of himself contrive to do as you have been doing, and make yourself old and young at a moment's notice, unless a god were with him.
If you see them ill treating me, steel your heart against my sufferings; even though they drag me feet foremost out of the house, or throw things at me, look on and do nothing beyond gently trying to make them behave more reasonably; but they will not listen to you, for the day of their reckoning is at hand.
You shall never have anything more to cry for in this world
It is more than I dared to hope for; thank God, thank God, that you should care for me at all
That would be an equally fair plea in both cases,' replied Nicholas; 'but if you put it upon that ground, I have nothing more to say, than, that if I were a writer of books, and you a thirsty dramatist, I would rather pay your tavern score for six months, large as it might be, than have a niche in the Temple of Fame with you for the humblest corner of my pedestal, through six hundred generations.
The board being now clear of the more substantial articles of food, and punch, wine, and spirits being placed upon it and handed about, the guests, who had been previously conversing in little groups of three or four, gradually fell off into a dead silence, while the majority of those present glanced from time to time at Mr Snittle Timberry, and the bolder spirits did not even hesitate to strike the table with their knuckles, and plainly intimate their expectations, by uttering such encouragements as 'Now, Tim,' 'Wake up, Mr Chairman,' 'All charged, sir, and waiting for a toast,' and so forth.
For it was the literature of a great and brilliant people who, far from attempting to make a divorce within man's nature, had aimed to 'see life steadily and see it whole,' who, giving free play to all their powers, had found in pleasure and beauty some of the most essential constructive forces, and had embodied beauty in works of literature and art where the significance of the whole spiritual life was more splendidly suggested than in the achievements of any, or almost any, other period.
We need books of this tart cathartic virtue more than books of political science or of private economy.