Mohammedanism


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Related to Mohammedanism: Muhammadan, Mahometan
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Synonyms for Mohammedanism

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In a speech to the House of Commons on 14 June 1921, Churchill warned of the dangers posed by the extremism of Saudi Arabia's Wahabi sect, a form of Mohammedanism which bears, roughly speaking, the same relation to orthodox Islam as the most militant form of Calvinism would have borne to Rome in the fiercest limes of the religious wars.
To the author, Henderson's greatest unforgivable crime was his prediction that "if Washington backed the frail new state of Israel, there would be nothing but decades of trouble and `the rise of fanatic Mohammedanism.
The same can be seen to be operative in Islamic culture, where disparate nations and peoples share a common ancestor in the civilizing force of Mohammedanism that unifies Islamic art, law, and religious practice.
Mr Asher combines his military background with a first-hand understanding of the area to show that Gordon's mission and death were only part of a much larger conflict between British Christian civilisation and the native Mohammedanism of northeast Africa.
and he, motivated by that regard, apostasized from the faith and assented to the repulsive religion of Mohammedanism.
Two decades later, in Edinburgh, James Stewart, the 1902 Duff Missionary Lecturer, highlighted the ambiguity of the situation: "Taking Mohammedanism as a whole, with its strange and wonderful career, the difficulty is how to fit that career, as an event permitted by God, into the progress of the world, or into the evolution of its spiritual history, and how to understand the purpose it was meant to serve.
20] For many Protestants a greater problem existed in the ancient Christian churches in the Ottoman Empire, commonly regarded as "the centre of Mohammedanism.
Rather oddly, the book lacks a sustained discussion of the new threat from militant Mohammedanism and the growth of state sponsored terrorism without which any discussion of foreign policy in the early twenty-first century is surely incomplete.
Meanwhile, he worked on the Urdu version of the Mizan (published in 1843) and on his Remarks on the Nature of Mohammedanism (1840).
From the eleventh century the 'road' declined as Mohammedanism overtook Chinese influence and as the sea route grew in importance.