Mohammed Reza Pahlavi


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Synonyms for Mohammed Reza Pahlavi

Shah of Iran who was deposed in 1979 by Islamic fundamentalists (1919-1980)

References in periodicals archive ?
Antagonism intensified when Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi was granted asylum by Anwar Sadat and later Iran named a street in memory of the Egyptian president's assassin, Khaled Islambouli.
He is convinced that Mohammed Reza Pahlavi was a 'good king' who died in peace and that his soul is with other 'good kings' history has not always treated with the respect they commanded in life.
The prince challenged the Islamic clergymen who orchestrated the overthrow of his late father, Mohammed Reza Pahlavi, in 1979, and called upon all Iranians to come under his personal leadership, in order to help him "offer the nation a way out of the catastrophic social, economic and political situation and its international isolation".
This would be an indication that conservative Islamic forces would play a dominant role in the country, just like the Iranian people established a quasi-theocracy after overthrowing Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi.
The long-delayed Bushehr project dates backs to 1974, when Iran's US-backed Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi contracted the German company Siemens to build the reactor.
Israel's loathing for Ahmedinejad and the mullahs may seem exaggerated, evoking nostalgia for the good old days of Mohammed Reza Pahlavi.
To these students, the leadership that took power three decades ago in a popular uprising against the repressive government of Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi is now the repressive establishment.
backed Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi 30 years ago and have always been a leading force behind political movements in Iran, both before and after the 1979 Islamic revolution.
The sale of lots from her estate totalled $118,000: it included an impressive Indian multistrand pearl and turquoise necklace, the front designed as a stylised peacock, which sold for $80,500 to a private Middle Eastern collector; and a cultured pearl and paste festoon brooch which was a gift from the late Shah of Iran, Mohammed Reza Pahlavi to her on the occasion of his wedding to Princess Fawzia, the sister of King Farouk, the late King of Egypt, which fetched $30,000.
A cultured pearl and paste 'festoon' brooch which was a gift from the late Shah of Iran, Mohammed Reza Pahlavi (1919-1980) to Umm Kulthum on the occasion of his wedding to Princess Fawzia, the sister of King Farouk, the late King of Egypt sold for Dh110,100 ($30,000).
Also included is an impressive Indian multi-strand pearl and turquoise necklace, the front designed as a stylized peacock, which is estimated at $15,000-25,000, a cultured pearl and paste 'festoon' brooch which was a gift from the late Shah of Iran, Mohammed Reza Pahlavi (1919-1980) to Umm Kulthum on the occasion of his wedding to Princess Fawzia, the sister of King Farouk, the late King of Egypt (estimate: $3,000-5,000) and a lady's cultured pearl and diamond wristwatch (estimate: $4,000-6,000).
Also included is an impressive Indian multi-strand pearl and turquoise necklace, the front designed as a stylised peacock, which is estimated at $15,000--25,000 (shown here), a cultured pearl and paste 'festoon' brooch which was a gift from the late Shah of Iran, Mohammed Reza Pahlavi (1919-1980) to Umm Kulthum on the occasion of his wedding to Princess Fawzia, the sister of King Farouk, the late King of Egypt (estimate: $3,000-5,000) and a lady's cultured pearl and diamond wristwatch (estimate: $4,000--6,000).
The catalog of US crimes, he said, dated to American support for the 1953 coup which deposed the elected government of Mohammed Mossadegh and installed Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi, who ruled until he was ousted in early 1979.
This made a newly elected president, Carlos Andres Perez, promise the Venezuelans they will become a developed country within a few years - Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi vowed to make Iran the world's fifth power.
Just as Mossadegh and Arbenz had something in common, so did Castillo Armas and Mohammed Reza Pahlavi, the US-installed shah.