metastasis

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Related to Metastatic lesion: metastasized
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  • noun

Words related to metastasis

the spreading of a disease (especially cancer) to another part of the body

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The eye is an uncommon site for metastatic lesions, as it does not have a well-developed lymphatic system.
Differential diagnosis of cutaneous RCC metastatic lesions includes sebaceous carcinoma, sweat gland tumor, and melanoma.
The metastatic lesions are usually multiple, ulcerated or polypoidal, hyper pigmented or amelanotic but rarely solitary.
This was associated with a mixed response seen on imaging, as evidenced by some metastatic lesions responding while others progressed.
The most common primary sites of origin for metastatic lesions to the liver in adults are the gastrointestinal malignancies.
In one robust prospective study of soft tissue masses, only 3% were metastatic lesions [1].
These metastatic lesions can lead to diagnostic challenge for clinicians as they can mimic primary colo-rectal cancer due to the lack of diagnostic signs.
PET-CT localizes previously undetected metastatic lesion in recurrent fallopian tube carcinoma.
Therefore, prior to any treatment of a presumed pathologic fracture or metastatic lesion, it is essential a confirmed diagnosis is made.
However, the peripheral rim enhancement in a metastatic lesion often has a serrated margin and not a nodular margin as seen in a hemangioma13.
The differential diagnosis at this point included a metastatic lesion from ACC versus renal cell carcinoma vs melanoma.
Our recording of palatine tonsil as metastatic lesion of amelanotic melanoma is the first worldwide.
The following report describes a case of small cell lung carcinoma with mandibular metastasis that metastatic lesion was discovered simultaneously with primary tumor.
Even more problematic is the use of DT to extrapolate backwards--that is, what size would the primary tumor or a metastatic lesion have been so many months or years before the diagnosis was made.
It is possible to confuse a metastatic lesion with a hemangioma because of the peripheral enhancement that generally is seen around a hypodense lesion.
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