Malayan

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Synonyms for Malayan

a member of a people inhabiting the northern Malay Peninsula and Malaysia and parts of the western Malay Archipelago

of or relating to or characteristic of Malaysia

Synonyms

of or relating to or characteristic of the people or language of Malaysia and the northern Malay Peninsula and parts of the western Malay Archipelago

Synonyms

References in periodicals archive ?
Ramakrishna accordingly writes that security officials, at the direction of Singaporean, Malayan, and British leaders, appropriately launched Operation Coldstore in 1963--a counter-subversion raid that detained without the need for trials more than one hundred subversives.
He then narrates the history of the Malayan Communist Party and the seditious intent of the communist united front in Singapore.
Ramakrishna cites a series of files that, if declassified for research, will appeal to scholars of the history of the Malayan Communist Party, security operations, and Singapore during the 1950s and 1960s.
Not fully elaborated in the narrative are the history of the anti-British movement, socioeconomic discontent in Singapore, and the appeal of the Malayan Communist Party.
Sir Evelyn Baring, the newly appointed governor, imported the Malayan model wholesale in order to combat the insurgency.
Finally, in contrast to the Malayan communists, who could draw upon their World War II experience of guerilla warfare against the Japanese, the Mau Mau lacked either the experience of or any preparation for guerilla warfare.
Unfortunately, another key similarity is that the insurgency has steadily gained in strength and effectiveness, just as the Malayan insurgency grew in the years before 1952.
In this vein, General Peter Schoomaker commended Lieutenant Colonel John Nagl's outstanding analysis of the British Army's performance as a learning organization during the Malayan Emergency, Learning to Eat Soup with a Knife: Counterinsurgency Lessons from Malaya and Vietnam (Westport: Praeger, 2002), to the House Armed Services Committee in the summer of 2004.
Lynn, "Patterns of Insurgency and Counterinsurgency," Military Review, 85 (July-August 2005), 27, the author briefly acknowledges the role that physical isolation and internment played in the Malayan Emergency without touching on its propensity for abuse.
John Coates, Suppressing Insurgency: An Analysis of the Malayan Emergency, 1948-1954 (Boulder, Colo.
British perceptions of the Tunku's political persona motivated their circumspection regarding his ability to negotiate the competing interests at play in Malayan domestic politics in the buildup to independence.
Most assessments of Tunku Abdul Rahman's role in Malayan history have focused primarily on developments in domestic politics rather than the conduct of Kuala Lumpur's foreign relations.
That is not to say, however, that he was the sole determinant of Malayan foreign policy.
17) By 1946 Onn bin Jaafar, the Malay nationalist and founder of UMNO, was appealing to Indonesia and Indonesian migrants in Malaya to assist in safeguarding the positions of Malays against the colonial-inspired Malayan Union project.
Malayan Ambassador Senu Abdul Rahman's welcome when he arrived to assume his post in Jakarta was a particularly telling episode.