asteroid belt

(redirected from Main asteroid belt)
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Words related to asteroid belt

the region of interplanetary space between Mars and Jupiter where most asteroids are found

References in periodicals archive ?
This denizen of the Main Asteroid Belt was "rediscovered" and renamed in 1996 as 1996 N2, and then designated a comet by Erik Elst and Guido Pizzaro.
Today, we celebrate an incredible exploration milestone as a spacecraft enters orbit around an object in the main asteroid belt for the first time," NASA Administrator Charles Bolden said.
It was spotted by the Hubble Space Telescope about 90 million miles from us in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.
They come from a variety of places and PPARC's collection includes samples from the main asteroid belt between Jupiter and Mars.
Its eccentric four-year orbit extends from just inside that of the Earth to the main asteroid belt and it came to around 2.
They are small rocky objects that move in elliptical orbits in the main asteroid belt between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter.
The primary objective of NASA's Dawn mission is to advance understanding of the origin and evolution of the solar system by rendezvousing with and studying Vesta and Ceres, which are located in the main asteroid belt, a large region located between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter.
Ceres, located in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter, is the largest unexplored world of the inner solar system.
Both Vesta and Ceres orbit the sun between Mars and Jupiter, in the main asteroid belt.
Dawn is approaching dwarf planet Ceres in the main asteroid belt with arrival expected in March 2015.
Particularly in the solar system's main asteroid belt - between Mars and Jupiter -- the researchers found a compositionally diverse mix of asteroids.
Millions of them orbit the sun between Mars and Jupiter in the main asteroid belt.
The results match exactly what would be expected if the moon were hit first by objects from the main asteroid belt during a period called the Late Heavy Bombardment, roughly 3.
Vesta and Ceres are located in the main asteroid belt, a large region located between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter.
In 2010, Richard Binzel, a professor of planetary sciences at MIT, identified a likely explanation: Asteroids orbiting in our solar system's main asteroid belt, situated between Mars and Jupiter, are exposed to cosmic radiation, changing the chemical nature of their surfaces and reddening them over time.