Lucy


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  • noun

Words related to Lucy

incomplete skeleton of female found in eastern Ethiopia in 1974

References in classic literature ?
cried Lucy, who generally made an amendment to all her sister's assertions.
But he came forward pleasantly enough and accepted the chair into which he was beckoned by Lucy.
He preferred to talk to Lucy, whose playing he remembered, rather than to Miss Bartlett, who probably remembered his sermons.
Lucy, in the midst of her success, found time to wish they did.
I am, as it were," she concluded, "the chaperon of my young cousin, Lucy, and it would be a serious thing if I put her under an obligation to people of whom we know nothing.
Oh, Charlotte," cried Lucy to her cousin, "we must have the rooms now.
Not till then did Miss Bartlett reply: "My own wishes, dearest Lucy, are unimportant in comparison with yours.
Lucy, not realizing either, was reduced to literature.
Mother wouldn't mind I'm sure," said Lucy, but again had the sense of larger and unsuspected issues.
It gave Lucy the sensation of a fog, and when she reached her own room she opened the window and breathed the clean night air, thinking of the kind old man who had enabled her to see the lights dancing in the Arno and the cypresses of San Miniato, and the foot-hills of the Apennines, black against the rising moon.
I am off, Lucy," he said, taking her two hands in his, and gazing tenderly down into her face; "I won't ask you to come with me now, but will you be ready to come when I am here again?
Tom, too, had come up to Lucy, but he was not going to kiss her--no; he came up to her with Maggie, because it seemed easier, on the whole, than saying, "How do you do?
A dreadful resolve was gathering in Maggie's breast, but it was arrested by the desire to know from her aunt Deane whether she would leave Lucy behind.
Yes, please, mother," said Lucy, timidly, blushing very pink all over her little neck.
But Maggie, as she stood crying before the glass, felt it impossible that she should go down to dinner and endure the severe eyes and severe words of her aunts, while Tom and Lucy, and Martha, who waited at table, and perhaps her father and her uncles, would laugh at her; for if Tom had laughed at her, of course every one else would; and if she had only let her hair alone, she could have sat with Tom and Lucy, and had the apricot pudding and the custard