guardian

(redirected from Law Guardian)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for guardian

Synonyms for guardian

a person who is legally responsible for the person or property of another considered by law to be incompetent to manage his or her affairs

Synonyms for guardian

References in periodicals archive ?
A broad reading might include cases where the supreme or surrogate's court appoints counsel to adults under FCA section 262, as long as a law guardian could be appointed in family court under FCA section 249.
Even if we were to ignore the jurisdictional defect in the proceeding, it is undisputed that [the child's] law guardian was not seeking to enforce any of [the child's] alleged constitutional rights," the court said.
Skittone, the lawyer appointed as Francine's law guardian, did not have it in for us, as his favorable report demonstrated.
Developed by Pinnacle Decision Systems, the Case Management System [CMS] assists the Society in its role as law guardian to most of the children who come before Family Court in all five boroughs of New York City.
Catholic poor law guardian George Godfrey Place defended the girls, "saying not one of them is a fallen girl.
Marc Ruebins, MD, appeared on camera in a Mineola courtroom from his Old Westbury office, and was questioned by attorneys and a law guardian who were in the courtroom.
It was as a Poplar Poor Law guardian that Lansbury won his first elective office: one of a small, but influential, socialist minority among the ranks of doctors, clergy, undertakers and freemasons.
It benefited from the 1834 Poor Law Amendment Act, which created elected Poor Law Guardians to run the workhouses, and the 1835 Municipal Corporations Act which set up the modern elected bodies which ran the cities and allowed the massive growth of civic pride.
At the same time, poor law guardians on the Brixworth union board began crusading policies with harsher and more stringent criteria for relief.