jabberwocky

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nonsensical language (according to Lewis Carroll)

References in periodicals archive ?
To end the Red Queen's reign of terror, Alice reluctantly acts as champion for the White Queen and battles the deadly Jabberwock.
They have fought their imaginary Jabberwock in loud combat and often-heroic prose.
On Saturday, Jabberwock Tale Spinners, a troupe of teen storytellers trained by Impact
Let's make up a tune to the Jabberwock," he said, and they sang loudly and not always together.
Jabberwock 2004 at the Lancaster Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority's charity show.
Her fiction and poetry have appeared in such nationally distributed journals as The Massachusetts Review, The Jabberwock Review, Spoon River Poetry Review, Sycamore Review, Louisiana Literature, The Bitter Oleander, and elsewhere.
The poem title was "Jabberwocky" but the monster was the Jabberwock.
131) See Beware the Jabberwock, supra note 56, at 473-74
Other writers such as JRR Tolkien and CS Lewis had to wait until their death for words such as Hobbit and Jabberwock to be included.
Katherine Heath as Alice makes her professional stage debut with a flawless performance, and is every inch the inquisitive youngster whose adventures with the Queen of Hearts and the Jabberwock have become a classic.
The reprinting of long-forgotten delicacies like Mugwamp in a Hole, Delta Jabberwock Ice Cream Cake, Chicken Brunswick Stew, Nat Turner Crackling Bread and Wandering Pilgrim's Stew deepens our knowledge of recipes that were seldom passed down or limited to certain regions.
Beatty as Bulworth is sui generis, a Jabberwock wiffling off to do battle with frumious bandersnatches, a bizarre life form unto himself.
Her poems have recently appeared in Midstream, Jewish Currents, 13th Moon, and Jabberwock.
Lewis Carroll would even create several just for children, including the Jabberwock and the frumious Bandersnatch.
I extract this term from Lewis Carroll's nonsense rhyme "Jabberwocky" [10, 180]: "And, as in uffish thought he stood, The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame, Came whiffling through the tulgey wood, And burbled as it came