idiomatic

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Synonyms for idiomatic

Synonyms for idiomatic

of or relating to or conforming to idiom

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Last but not least, the idiomatic productivity of face will be set in a cross-linguistic perspective in order to shed some contrastive light on the semantics of the analysed English phraseological formations and their French, German and Italian counterparts or--most frequently--semantic relatives.
For example, the senses of the following idiomatic expressions are linked to sense E: 'to be ugly' FACE like the corner of the street, FACE like the back of the tram/bus, FACE like a Buckley pan-mug (4), FACE like the side of the house, FACE like w welder's bench, worse FACE than under a cork upon a bottle (5) (see TEM).
The idiomatic senses that may be said to be most abundantly represented and most telling both in the comparative and diachronic perspective are the sense 'to be persevering', expressed by the idiomatic expression to make a good/great FACE, and the sense 'to be sad/disappointed', encoded by the idiom to draw/wear/pull a long FACE.
It seems that the idiomatic senses in question may be assumed to be A-related, since their semantics may be proved to be linked to the attributive values specified for sense A 'the front part of the head from forehead to the chin in men'.
The Brand Idiomatics Consumption Context Index uses non-traditional inputs -- economic, cultural, social and political trends and events -- to benchmark and track the context in which consumers are considering, comparing and committing to brands.
Melnick points to the numbers released late last week by Costco and Neiman Marcus as Exhibit A in making the case for the new value equation -- and for Brand Idiomatics being ahead of the consumption context curve.
BRAND IDIOMATICS, located in Newtown, PA, combines traditional category and audience data with non-endemic econometric inputs - including economic, cultural, political and forward-looking indicators -- to track and predict long-cycle shifts in consumer outlook and behaviors, identify the inherent business issues, and develop the best strategies for the business need and consumption context.
The brain child of nationally recognized media and consumer trends authority Bill Melnick -- who as Director of Marketing at Vanity Fair helped make the term "Alpha Consumer" part of the modern marketing lexicon -- Brand Idiomatics helps marketers define changes in the context in which consumers experience a brand, and translate brand messages into the right idiom for the new context.
Indeed, the core Brand Idiomatics premise holds that a convergence of economic, cultural, social and political trends are driving wholesale change in consumer behavior and consumption patterns -- and creating a whole new set of business issues for brands.
The key Brand Idiomatics product offer is also its key differentiator -- a proprietary process that combines traditional category and audience data with non-endemic, econometric inputs -- including economic, cultural, political and forward-looking indicators -- to track and predict long-cycle shifts in consumer outlook and behaviors, identify the inherent business issues, define the new brand message idiom and develop the best strategies for the business need and the consumption context.
I know that in over three decades on both the agency and client side of the table -- including leading landmark campaigns at CNBC, Vanity Fair and Merrill Lynch -- I've never seen anything like the Brand Idiomatics approach and offer.
He regrets, too, that "colloquial licentiousness", by which he means idiomatic innovations brought about by illiterate writers, "sully the grammatical purity".
Of course, there were also linguists who took everything in the natural language as idiomatic, and therefore a "sciences" of idioms was in their opinion something like epistemology.
We should note that what is considered grammatical need not be idiomatic, and what is idiomatic may sometimes be ungrammatical.
Similarly, sentences (6) and (9b) are correct yet not idiomatic, and the same can be said about examples (7) and (8).