trauma

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Related to Head trauma: concussion, Traumatic brain injury
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Synonyms for trauma

Synonyms for trauma

marked tissue damage, especially when produced by physical injury

something that jars the mind or emotions

Synonyms for trauma

References in periodicals archive ?
Regardless of the situation, any time any one of us suffers a head impact, it makes sense to take a moment to consider if a head trauma may have occurred.
We present the case of a 19 month old male child who developed an ischemic stroke secondary to minor head trauma.
However, people with memory and thinking impairments and a history of head trauma had levels of amyloid plaques an average of 18 percent higher than those with no head trauma history.
Damage from head trauma in football is considered to arise from classic concussions, when the player experiences amnesia, confusion or loss of consciousness.
He found that the transformed migraines that were abruptly triggered followed an illness 46% of the time and were triggered by minor head trauma 18% of the time, while the individual cases were triggered by idiopathic intracranial hypertension or developed after surgery.
He found that the transformed migraines that were abruptly triggered followed an illness 46% of the time and were triggered by minor head trauma 18% of the time, while individual cases were triggered by idiopathic intracranial hypertension or developed after surgery.
Childhood injuries III: Epidemiology of non-motor vehicle head trauma.
The cells may also underlie sleep disturbances associated with head trauma and other ailments, he says.
Over the last 24 months more than 200 patients with various balance disorders--including acoustic neuroma resection, head trauma, postconcussion, Meniere's disease, vertiginous migraines, vestibular neuronitis, and presbystasis--have been treated with this protocol.
We describe the results of measuring the concentrations of both GFAP and S-100 protein in the blood of patients with acute severe head trauma and healthy controls, using the dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluorescence immunoassay (DELFIA) system for detection of GFAP (DELFIA can also be used to measure the concentration of GFAP in CSF).
Mild traumatic brain injury refers to head trauma without loss of consciousness or with a loss of consciousness lasting less than 20 minutes (Gasquoine, 1997; Miller, 1996).
These two cases involved repeated head trauma with probably concussions that separately might have been considered mild, but in additive effect were fatal.
Causes other than head trauma include viral infections, nasal allergies, certain medications, aging, and smoking.
Plans for the site include the demolition of the main administration building to make way for a $10 million one-story residential building and 60-bed skilled nursing care facility for young adults with head trauma and spinal cord injuries.